Showing posts with label Ancestry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ancestry. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Ancestry.ca - Campbell River, British Columbia newspaper database



Ancestry.ca has put on another database and this one concerns the index of birth, marriage, and death information from three newspapers serving the Campbell River, British Columbia, area in central Vancouver Island, and they are -

Campbell River Courier, 1947–1974

Comox Argus, 1917–1945

Campbell River Upper Islander, 1964–1990


Details vary depending on the paper and type of event, but you may find the following:

· name

· birth date and place

· christening date and place

· father’s name

· mother’s name

· spouse’s name

· marriage date and place

· death date and place

· age at death

· burial date and place

Information for this index was extracted by members of the Campbell River Genealogy Society.

The website is at http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=2492

Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Ancestry.ca

Thursday, May 1, 2014

British Columbia, Canada, Estate Files, 1859-1949

 Another case of the partnership between Ancestry and FamilySearch. 

Ancestry has the browsable images on their site, and you can browse by Judicial District/Locality, whereas FamilySearch has the background information that could help you to search estate files in British Columbia. plus browsable images.

So how is this system working? It brings the holdings of the FamilySearch site to a different audience, but Ancestry isn’t adding any new records by doing this. Are you satisfied with this change?

At one time apparently, Ancestry would only put on indexed records, now it appears that they have moved to include browsable images.

You can search the site at Ancestry http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=9806

You can read the information at FamilySearch at https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/British_Columbia_Estate_Files_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)

The images are at FamilySearch at https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2014768

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Free Access to Ancestry.ca

This just came across my desk this afternoon from Ancestry.ca –

TORONTO (June 25, 2013) – Ancestry.ca, Canada’s largest family history resource, is celebrating Canada Day with the launch of a collection of historical records that pre-date Confederation. Dating back to 1743, these are some of the oldest records ever to become available and be fully searchable online. In addition, Ancestry.ca is offering free access, from June 27 through July 2, to more than 40 million Canadian historical records from some of its most popular collections

Among the records being made available for free from June 27 through July 2 are some of the most popular collections on Ancestry.ca, including:

·         Canadian Passenger Lists and Ocean Arrivals – These collections consist of all records of immigration to Canada by ship or overland from the United States between 1865 and 1935, a period of 70 years that saw the largest influx of immigration into Canada ever, from all parts of the world.

·         The 1871 Census of Canada – the first census Canada conducted as a nation, which gives a snapshot of the lives of the people living at the time, including their ages, their jobs, the birthplaces of their parents, their neighbours and more.

·         Soldiers of the First World War – This collection contains the Attestation papers of all 600,000+ men enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and includes information about the soldier’s birthplace, next of kin, regiment number and more.

To check out the new Pre-Confederation records please visit www.ancestry.ca/150years and to search the records being made accessible for free in time for Canada Day, visit www.ancestry.ca/canadaday.


Happy Canada Day!

Sunday, March 17, 2013

FREE access to immigrant roots to end soon

Free access to select immigration records ends at midnight Eastern Daylight Time, today, Sunday, March 17th. 

So come to Ancestry.com right now to learn about an ancestor's voyage to America in passenger lists. Or find out if they traveled by land in border crossings records.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Dick Eastman and Tourtière Genealogy

Dick Eastman wrote in his newsletter this morning about his French-Canadian ancestry, and the making of the Christmas meat pie in an article called “Tourtière Genealogy”. 

He talks about how he has it every Christmas, but he didn’t realize that people from different parts of Quebec have different views on meat pies – and it is tied in with their ancestry.

The article came about because of a story in The Montreal Gazette by Susan Semenak in which she talks about the beloved French-Canadian food tourtière called “The genealogy of your tourtière: The Quebec Christmas feast staple, the tourtière, can reveal where a person’s family comes from”.

To read about it, go to www.montrealgazette.com/genealogy+your+tourti%C3%A8re/7683786/story.html

To read Dick's article, go to http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2012/12/tourti%C3%A8re-genealogy.html


© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Genealogical Day in England and Wales (Seminar)

Gary Schroder, QFHS President, will give a talk on Sa turday, March 31st 2012 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Quebec Family History Society Llibrary, 173 Cartier Avenue in Pointe-Claire.

The purpose of this seminar will be to A) examine the basic structures of family history research in England, Civil Registration of BMD's 1837-2005, Censuses 1841-1911, Wills 1858-2011, etc., and B) examine how to find your ancestors for the period prior to 1837 and how to make the best use of the English databases to found to be found on Ancestry and other commercial websites.

Reservations are necessary: call 514.695.1502, or you can visit the society online at http://www.qfhs.ca/. The fee $30.00.

Saturday, March 3, 2012

Scottish Ancestry Research Workshop

A press release was received from Christine Woodcock the other day, and it says -

"Christine Woodcock will be giving a talk at the Kitchener Public Library (Country Hills Branch) on Monday, March 19th at 6:30 pm.

Her talk will center around the Statutory Records, Old Parish Registers, The Scottish Naming Pattern, Irregular Marriages, Making Use of the Census Records, and other useful resources including online resources, local resources, and more.

Admission is free (being Scottish, this is always my favourite price!) but you are asked to call the library ahead of time to register (519-743-3558). This will also help us to ensure we have enough hand-outs for everyone.

You can also contact Christine at cdwoodcock56@sympatico.ca

Thursday, February 23, 2012

QFHS - Seminars and Public Lecture Series

News has been received from the Quebec Family History Society (QFHS) in Montreal that they will host two events in March, and they are -

The War of 1812 (Free Lecture)

It will take place on Saturday, March 10, 2012 at 10:30 a.m. at the Briarwood Presbyterian Church Hall, 70 Beaconsfield Blvd, Beaconsfield, QC, H9W 3Z3.

The talk, given by Luc Lépine, will be a lecture about the War of 1812 and will focus on events that took place in Lower Canada (now Quebec) and the Battle of Châteauguay. Luc Lépine is one of the leading experts on the War of 1812 and author of the book, Lower Canada's Militia Officers, 1812 - 1815.
_________________________________________________________________

A Genealogical Day in England and Wales (Seminar)

It will be held on Saturday, March 31, 2012, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Quebec Family History Society Library, 173 Cartier Ave., Pointe-Claire, QC H9S 4H9, and will be presented by Gary Schroder.

The purpose of this seminar will be to a) examine the basic structures of family history research in England, Civil Registration of BMDs, 1837-2005; Censuses, 1841-1911; Wills 1858-2011, etc.; and b) examine how to find your ancestors for the period prior to 1837 and how to make the best use of the English databases to be found on Ancestry and other commercial websites.

Reservations are necessary. Please call 514.695.1502

For details, visit them online at http://www.qfhs.ca/

Thursday, October 30, 2008

Métis Nation Seeks Genealogist

I recently received (indirectly) an email from Karole Dumont-Beckett, Registrar of the Métis Nation of Ontario's head office in Ottawa, looking for a full-time genealogist/historian.

The link for the job description is located at <www.metisnation.org/voyageur/articles/job_postings/08oc_genealogist.pdf>.

Deadline for application for this interesting position is November 10, 2008.

There are other opportunities across Canada, so if Ottawa is out of your area, perhaps something a little closer to (your) home might be available.

In any event, this is an interesting site, and offers a lot of information for those looking for their Métis ancestry, and the latest in news and events. Check out their magazine, Métis Voyageur, at <www.metisnation.org/voyageur/in_print/home.html>.

As well, this big news item from a recent press release on their site -

"MNO, Ontario Government and Council of Ontario Universities announce University of Ottawa selected to host first Ontario Research Chair in Métis Studies (Often unknown history of Ontario Métis will start to be told)". The link is <www.metisnation.org/voyageur/articles/national/08_sep_Chair_Annouce.html>.

For more information, please contact Karole at:

Karole Dumont-Beckett
Registrar / Director of Registry
Métis Nation of Ontario
500 Old St-Patrick St. Unit D, Ottawa, ON, KIN 9G4
Ph: 613-798-1488 Ph: 800-263-4889
Fx: 613-722-4225
Email: karoled@metisnation.org
Website: www.metisnation.org

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Ancestry.ca Launches Online the "Canadian Passenger Lists 1865-1935"

At 10 o'clock this morning (on Tuesday, September 16, 2008), Josh Hanna — Ancestry.com's Senior Vice-President — announced in Toronto that it has put the Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 online at <http://landing.ancestry.ca/intl/canada/passenger/lists.aspx> in both French and English (simply click the language link at the top of the page).

I have been on the site (even though all of my ancestors came to Canada pre-1865) to see what it is all about, and there is 1,441 BARCLAYs who came to Canada and 178 BLADES. (To those who don't know - my father's line is through the surname of BARCLAY, and my mother's name was BLADES - both of them descendent from United Empire Loyalists who came to Canada in 1783 and 1784, respectivly, from the United States.)

The passenger lists covers the provinces and cities of Quebec (Quebec Ports, May 1865-June 1908, June 1919-July 1921, April 1925-November 1935); Montreal (April 1925-November 1935); Halifax, Nova Scotia (1881-October 1922, 1925-1935); North Sydney, Nova Scotia (November 1906, August 1908-August 1922, 1925-1935); Saint John, New Brunswick ( 1900-September 1922, 1925-1935); Vancouver, British Columbia (1905-September 1922, 1925-1935); Victoria, British Columbia and Pacific Ports (April 1905-September 1922, 1925-1935) and some eastern U.S. Ports (July 1905-1919, 1925-1928) and New York City, which covers 1906 to 1921.

When you put the name into the search engine you may get their estimated year of birth, their birth country (although many of the immigrants did not mention their country of birth), date of arrival, name of the vessel, and port of departure. You can then view the image from which the information was taken.

It appears that the partnership that was forged between Ancestry.com and the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) in May, 2007 was not adhered to in this instance because nowhere is the LAC mentioned in the Ancestry.com press release.*

But it may be worth checking the LAC site <www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/immigrants> because they have some of the passenger lists onsite, too. They also have the Moving Here, Staying Here. The Canadian Immigrant Experience online, and it's worth looking at it because it can give you the background behind immigration.

This past August, Sylvie Tremblay, Chief Project Manager of the Canada Genealogy Centre, said that the LAC has embarked on a three to five year project where they hope to develop a family history site where you will go to get the "story behind the headlines". They will make the connections for you between the databases, and the history in family history, and they are looking towards wikis to do this - so watch for that.

In the meantime, you can look up your ancestor on Ancestry.ca, and decide if you want to spend the money to do a deeper search. Remember, you can also get a 14-day trial at <www.ancestry.ca>.

*The LAC is mentioned in the CNW News Release. It refers to the LAC in that the LAC holds the official records on microfilm.