Showing posts with label Ancestry.com. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ancestry.com. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Ancestry.com LLC acquires Find a Grave


On the last day of September, Ancestry.com made the following announcement -

PROVO, Utah, Sept. 30, 2013 -- Ancestry.com LLC announced today it has acquired Find A Grave, Inc., the leading online cemetery database.

With over 100 million memorials and 75 million photos, Find A Grave has amassed an unparalleled collection of burial information. Over the past 18 years, it has grown to become an invaluable resource for genealogists, history buffs and cemetery preservationists. Find A Grave will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Ancestry.com, and will continue to be managed by its founder, Jim Tipton.

"Find A Grave is an amazing phenomenon supported by a passionate and engaged community of volunteers around the world," said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. "We at Ancestry.com are so excited...honored really...to take on the responsibility of supporting this community. We will maintain Find A Grave as a free website, will retain its existing policies and mode of operation, and look forward to working with Jim Tipton and the entire Find A Grave team to accelerate the development of tools designed to make it even easier for the Find A Grave community to fulfill its original mission to capture every tombstone on Earth."

Ancestry.com plans to bolster the resources dedicated to Find A Grave to launch a new mobile app, improve customer support, introduce an enhanced edit system for submitting updates to memorials, foreign-language support, and other site improvements.

"Ancestry.com has been a long-time supporter of Find A Grave. They have been linking and driving traffic to the site for several years," said Jim Tipton, founder of Find A Grave. "Burial information is a wonderful source for people researching their family history and I look forward to working with Ancestry.com to help continue our growth and accelerate the pace of improvements."

The terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

Friday, September 6, 2013

One billion global records will be available online

This notice was received yesterday, and it says that Ancestry.com and FamilySearch is going to make a billion records available online over the next five years! 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org), the two largest providers of family history resources, announced today an agreement that is expected to make approximately 1 billion global historical records available online and more easily accessible to the public for the first time. With this long-term strategic agreement, the two services will work together with the archive community over the next five years to digitize, index and publish these records from the FamilySearch vault.

The access to the global collection of records marks a major investment in international content as Ancestry.com continues to invest in expanding family history interest in its current markets and worldwide. Ancestry.com expects to invest more than $60 million over the next five years in the project alongside thousands of hours of volunteer efforts facilitated by FamilySearch.


“This agreement sets a path for the future for Ancestry.com and FamilySearch to increasingly share international sets of records more collaboratively,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. “A significant part of our vision for family history is helping provide a rich, engaging experience on a global scale. We are excited about the opportunities it will bring to help benefit the family history community and look forward to collaborating with FamilySearch to identify other opportunities to help people discover and share their family history.”

The organizations will also be looking at other ways to share content across the two organizations. Both organizations expect to add to the already digitized records shared across the two websites in addition to new record projects to be completed over the next five years.

“We are excited to work with Ancestry.com on a vision we both share,” said Dennis Brimhall, President of FamilySearch. “Expanding online access to historical records through this type of collaboration can help millions more people discover and share their family’s history.”

Thursday, April 18, 2013

UPDATE: Ancestry.com has FREE Marriage Records

I usually don’t write about Ancestry.com (I just concentrate on Ancestry.ca), but if you want to find marriage records of your immigrant ancestors (especially if they were married in the United States before they came to Canada), you have free access until the 21st.

The site is at www.ancestry.com/cs/us/family-marriages

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Ancestry.com Webinars

Monday night, I listened to a webinar given by Ancestry.com called “Ready, Set, Go! Family History How-To Everyone Should Know”.

Although I don't usually write on Ancestry.com (I try keep my remarks to their Canadian website, Ancestry.ca, on my blog), I made an exception this week, and listened to an introductory webinar. I wanted to hear what they had to say about researching, and Crista Cowan (the girl who lead the webinar – she is behind The Barefoot Genealogist's blog on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/notes/crista-cowan/why-am-i-called-the-barefoot-genealogist/3140686791615) gave some good tips that anyone can use – be they a beginner or an experienced genealogist.

She gave a list of what she calls “Genealogy Conventions”. I picked three conventions to write on -  

When dealing with a married couples, always put the woman's maiden name with her married name in the family tree. I always put (if I know it) her maiden name in the family tree, or in the search box. That is, if I know what it is. If you don't know what it is when searching, leave that field blank. In French-Canadian genealogy, it is preferable (because of Quebec civil laws listing all of a female's records under her birth name) to use the woman's maiden name when looking up civil records, as it will greatly increase your chances of finding her records vice finding them under her married name).

In a family tree, put the surname that you are researching in CAPS (capital letters), and leave all other names in non-caps. Now this is interesting, but it make perfect sense. The surname will leap out at you when it is in caps, and you can easily find the name you are looking for. An excellent idea!  

The trouble with place names — which seems to be a constant complaint I hear with my research work in Canada — is, how do I approach this? Crista says that it is a problem everywhere – just think about the problems in Europe!

But we have problems in Canada, too. Right now, I am researching a place in Ontario that had a name change in 1800s, plus a township name change.  

So, you must put the exact name where the event took place.  

Remember that in order to find out all the information which is on the 1851 Canada Census, you must check with the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) website www.lac-bac.gc.ca – and you must have the correct name in the search box, or else the search engine will say, “No Results Found”. Ancestry doesn't show everything on a record, so you will have to go to the LAC to find the information.

I must say that it was very good. If you missed it on the 14th, it is going to be placed in their onsite archives in the Learning Center at www.ancestry.com/cs/HelpAndAdviceUS.

Postscript: One place to check first on Ancestry.ca to see if they have a certain record is the Card Catalog http://search.ancestry.ca/search/CardCatalog.aspx#ccat=hc%3D25%26dbSort%3D1%26sbo%3D1%26. They have all the records there, and you can check that first before deciding to subscribe to Ancestry.ca. And it's FREE!

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Sault Ste. Marie Public Library

I see where the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library Community Access Program is offering free Ancestry.com workshops to members of the community.

The one hour workshops will be available until March 29, 2012. Morning, afternoon and weekend workshops are offered. Class sizes are limited to six participants and spots are filling up quickly.

They says that they are "pleased to bring back one of their most popular workshops “Using Ancestry.com”. This workshop will help you discover your genealogy and build your ancestral family tree. Using the library’s account on ancestry.com you have access to millions of historical records to research your family tree. This workshop will guide you through using the ancestry.com database".

And before you go to the library, check out the Genealogy Section of their website, where they have put resources in a pdf. Some examples are "The Anishainaabe: Tracing Your Ancestral Line", and "French Canadian Genealogy".

To sign up for a workshop, or for more information please visit the main branch of the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library or contact the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library Reference and Information Desk at (705) 759-5236.

Their website is http://www.ssmpl.ca


UPDATE! I see where the Ontario Genealogical Society has revamped it's front page to reflect the end of the 50th Anniversary Year, and they have put it back to the way it was before – somewhat.


If you are looking for TONI (one of the OGSs most popular pages), go to the right, and click on the page. It use to be at the front of the page in the old configuration.

The OGS site is www.ogs.on.ca.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Free Access – Immigration to the US

Yesterday, I had the post about "Free Access - Immigration from the UK", today there is more news, and it is free access (August 29th to September 5th)to "Immigration to the US". One of the areas to check is the “Border Crossings: From Canada to U.S., 1895-1956”.

I spent the morning working on my grandfather Lester John BLADES from Barrington Passage, Nova Scotia. There were at least 17 trips he made to New York from 1925 to 1935. While in New York, he worked on yachts that travelled around the world, and while in Boston, he worked in factories.

Do you have Canadian ancestors who went to the States looking for work, or ancestors going on vacation to visit their relatives?

If you do, using Ancestry.com until Sept 5 is an excellent way to discover the trips they made from 1895 to 1956.

The website is at
http://www.ancestry.com/immigration?cj=1&o_xid=0004887102&o_lid=0004887102