Showing posts with label Archives of Ontario. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Archives of Ontario. Show all posts

Thursday, October 30, 2014

New post about the Archives of Ontario (AO)


Have you ever read Jane MacNamara’s blog Where the story takes me:Tales of family and local history research and folk I meet along the way?

If it isn’t on your reading list, maybe it should be, because she always has subjects that are interesting to genealogists.

Her latest post is worth reading if you have Ontario ancestors – because it is a post about the Archives of Ontario (AO).

In the post, she explains what the AO holds, and what you can find within the different archival material – and there is tons of material for you to research.

Let me say that the AO does live up to Jane’s review. I found it very centrally located to where I was staying, had good access for parking, excellent facility to eat your lunch or to just take a break away from researching. There is a very good a shopping centre which is a short distance from the archives.

There is one thing that I would add, and that is, be sure to read the information first onsite at the archives website before going there. Become familiar with the holdings, and it will be so helpful when you start researching. I printed the material off before I went there, and had it in a folder for easy reference. And if it is the first time that you will be there, be sure to register to your pass online, and then pick it up at the front desk once you get there.

Jane’s blog is at http://wherethestorytakesme.ca/

The website for the Archives of Ontario is Tracing your ancestry at the Archives of Ontario at http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/tracing/index.aspx

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Archives of Ontario - First World War Exhibit

The Archives of Ontario (AO), in Toronto, has put on an exhibit of a First World War family where six brothers enlisted. The exhibit is called The McLean Brothers of Sunderland,Ontario Real Genealogy Stories WWI Exhibit in the Archives Reading Room on the main floor, just to the left of the reception desk.

This is the story about of six brothers of the same family who enlisted together to take part in the Canadian war efforts. In partnership with guest curator Paul Hector this exhibit uses AO genealogical records to bring a very unique First World War family story to life.

I made my yearly trek to the AO in April of this year, and spent two days there, and accomplished a lot of client research. It is a fantastic facility, with a friendly, helpful staff. And it has a manuscript holdings that you can loose yourself in – I was impressed!

At that time they were busy gathering material for the exhibit, and I am glad that they were able to put it together. So if you are in Toronto, you should plan to visit.


They also have another exhibit online that you can visit - Dear Sadie – Loves, Lives, and Remembrance from Ontario’s First World War.

In this exhibit, you can read about four different families and what happened to them during the First World War. This exhibit “highlights the impact that the war had on individual lives”. 


I plan to return next June to do more research.

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Ontario: Then and Now


The Archives of Ontario is offering a new feature and is asking for your help.

Grab your camera and get involved on Flickr! Recreate our fascinating historical photographs of neighbourhoods and landmarks across the province. We’ll provide the “then”… you provide the “now”! 

This is a great idea. It will allow you and others to see how a neighbourhood or landmark use to look years ago, and the way it looks today. Or does it look the same or different? 

You can find out about the new project by going to https://www.flickr.com/groups/ontariothenandnow

Sunday, January 6, 2013

Township Papers of the Province of Ontario

Mike More, the vice president of the OGS wrote this notice in the OGS e-Weekly Digest yesterday -

"The Township Papers (Archives of Ontario RG 1-58) are a large collection of documents that date from c1783 to c1870.

The documents include copies of orders-in-council, location certificates and tickets, assignments, certificates of settlement duties, correspondence and some wills. The records are arranged by township, town, or village and, within each township, by concession and then lot number. When a document dealt specifically with a particular piece of property and did not appear to fit within another records series, it was placed within the Township Papers. Once you know the particular lot of land the settler was granted, it is worth looking at the Township Papers since there may be information about the settler.

There are 540 reels of Township Papers with 528,000 pages of information, held by the Archives of Ontario in Toronto. An index to these would be a tremendous resource for Ontario genealogists but it is a HUGE job. The best indexers would be people who know the township and have an interest in the people therein. Since most of the material is hand written, everything has to be proofed, i.e. two people have to read the whole file looking for names.

OGS is considering a project to index the Township Papers of Ontario. We will need a number of volunteers to do the work but first we somebody to lead the Ontario Township Indexing Project. Are you up to the challenge? Would you like to be part of the team that brings these resources to light"?

On a personal note, this indexing project would be a great help to us who use these papers on a regular basis. I urge you to consider this as a worthwhile project.

For more information or to offer your services, contact Mike More at vp@ogs.on.ca

Thursday, February 2, 2012

Spring Meetings for Toronto Branch OGS


The Branch will be presenting five courses in April and May 2012. Three are co-sponsored by the Toronto Public Library, and two are being held at the Archives of Ontario:

Going Back to Basics – A Refresher
This course will cover the basic resources used to find your family history – it will be centred on Ontario records, but can be expanded to cover participants’ areas of interest. Instructor: Ruth Burkholder

Hands-On Ontario Estate Records
Participants will follow assigned case histories to learn hands-on at the Archives of Ontario how to find estate files and land registry records. Instructor: Jane E. MacNamara

Advanced English Family History
This course will focus on the 1700-1837 period – topics will include vital events, parish research, population listings, poor relief, apprenticeship, land tenancy and inheritance records. Instructors: James F.S. Thomson and Joan Read

A Day of Technology for Family Historians
Spend a full day finding out how technology can assist family historians in finding and organizing information, and in editing and sharing photographs and other images. Instructor: Carol Nichols

Hands-On Early Ontario Land Records
Participants will learn through hands-on practice how to use the collections at the Archives of Ontario to trace ancestors’ attempts to acquire land in Upper Canada. Instructor: Jane E. MacNamara

For program details, course dates, speaker biographies and information on how to register for Toronto Branch courses, visit www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html.