Showing posts with label FamilySearch. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FamilySearch. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

FamilySearch Update: Newfoundland, Vital Records, 1840-1949

FamilySearch has made additions to the index and images of births, delayed registrations of births, marriages, and deaths of Newfoundland 1840-1942.

363,845 records have been indexed, with images added or upgraded as of 10 June 2015

Newfoundland, including the area of Labrador, became a province of Canada in 1949. Official registration of births, marriages, and deaths began in 1891.

Until 1948, most vital records were copies of church records.

Official registration of births, marriages, and deaths did not occur in Newfoundland until 1891.

The website is at

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Saturday, May 30, 2015 announcement at OGS Conference

Stephen Young, of in Salt Lake City, Utah, made a big announcement at Saturday evening's banquet at the OGS Conference in Barrie (Ontario).

FamilySearch has published the images linked to the already published civil registration indexes of Ontario. The announcement was being coordinated with the Archives of Ontario.

Stephen also tells me that he will be reviewing all the Canadian publications put online by FamilySearch since January 1st.

I have looked at the images, and they are VERY clear, and THEY ARE SOURCED!!!

You can go to the following sites to view the records -

Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927

Ontario Births, 1869-1912

Ontario Deaths, 1869-1937 and Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947

Happy researching!!!

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Update: Newfoundland Census

FamilySearch has made the following update to Newfoundland records as follows -
Newfoundland is different from the rest of Canada because it did not become a province until 1949. Before that time, it was a colony of Great Britain, and the normal rules for the releasing of census records did not apply until they became a province. 
Also, if you want to learn more about Newfoundland and Labador, you can read up on the records at the FamilySearch Wiki page at 
The two genealogy websites for Newfoundland and Labador are Newfoundland's Grand Banks Genealogy Site at, and the Family History Society of Newfoundland and Labrador at
Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!
It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23,  2012. 

Sunday, February 1, 2015 offers FREE classes

The classes are -

07 February 2015 Registros civiles y censos. This class provides instructions on how to use Spanish civil registers and census records. It is for Spanish-speaking guests and is taught in Spanish. Class starts at 1:00 p.m.

21 February 2015 * Boy Scout Genealogy Merit Badge Workshop. This workshop begins at 10:00 a.m. Register for this 90-minute class at least one week prior to the workshop to find out which requirements should be completed before attending. For registration information, call 1-801-240-4673.

21 February 2015 Qué dice? Cόmo leer la escritura antigua. This class provides tips and guidelines for reading old Spanish handwriting. It is for Spanish-speaking guests and is taught in Spanish. Class starts at 1:00 p.m.

26 February 2015 FamilySearch Historical Records Collection Webinar. This class begins at 6:00 p.m. It provides an overview of what the FamilySearch Historical Records Collection has to offer researchers and some tips on how to get the most from your searches.

28 February 2015 * British Research Series. These classes include “British Resources on,” and “British Resources on” Classes run from 9:15 a.m. to noon.

28 February 2015 * German Research Series. These classes include “Learning to Read Old German Script” (2 hours) and “Extracting Information from German Church and Civil Records.” Classes run from 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

28 February 2015 African-American Research Series. The topics include “Keynote Speaker,” “Beginning African-American Research: Post 1865,” and “Southern Plantation Records.” Classes run from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

These classes and workshops are designed to help individuals and families find their ancestors and teach others family history techniques. I have already put into my calendar FamilySearch Historical Records Collection Webinar.

How about you?

* Registration is required for classes with an asterisk. Register by 9:00 p.m. the Thursday before the class date by sending an email to or calling 1-801-240-4950. Go to for additional information.


If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Dear Myrt’s Beginning Genealogy - Session 2

As I promised in my blog on 06 January 2014 at, I watched Dear Myrt’s Beginning Genealogy Session 2 yesterday. I will continue to watch the rest of the study group as it proceeds. 

The two main topics that were discussed yesterday were the FamilySearch Wiki, and the transcription of records.

First, we went back to the FamilySearch Wiki where we were last week, and this time, we went to the Research Process at

Dear Mryt spent time explaining the 5 steps of researching to us – 1. Identify what you know 2. Decide what you want to learn 3. Select the records to search 4. Obtain and search the records and 5. Evaluate and Use the information.

Then she went to the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) at and went through the five elements of the GPS. You must know these five elements in order to conduct ‘reasonably exhaustively research’ properly, thereby making your conclusions sound.

She asked for people to take birth, marriage, and death records and share them with us, and we saw records from Pennsylvania and Great Britain. Different aspect were then discussed, errors were noted on the certificates, and people were asked to give their ways of handling different errors in records.

The second subject was the importance of doing proper and accurate transcriptions of records, which can then point out these errors, for example.

It is necessary that to transcribe every record we come across in a record, because it helps to understand the complete record, and what it is saying to you, the researcher.

So if you want to watch this session, it is available online at

Remember to make yourself a member of Dear Myrt’s Genealogy Community before watching the YouTube Google+ Hangout on Air at

If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Friday, January 9, 2015 Will Be Turned Off on 01 February 2015

WARNING! This does not mean that is closing down!

I think there has been confusion over the closing of as has been evident of Thomas MacEntee's Facebook page at Only this site will be disabled and closed down. will remain open. This is planned to take place on 01 February, 2015. 

As the website says, “On February 1, all public APIs (application programming interfaces) will be turned off, as will be the ability to access the program. This step is necessary as we enter the final phase, which is to transfer and synchronize all of the remaining data from to FamilySearch Family Tree. It is anticipated that this final phase of data testing, transfer, and retesting will require a year to complete. Once this phase is completed in early 2016, will be completely shut down”.

To read the rest of the press release, go to

If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Dear Myrt’s Beginning Genealogy - Session 1

As I promished in my blog on 06 January 2014 at, I watched Dear Myrt’s Beginning Genealogy yesterday. It passed my test of ‘Was it worhwhile?” with a resounding “Yes!”. I will continue to watch the rest of the study group as it proceeds.
There were a couple things that I learned, and they were -
She is taking the FamilySearch Wiki as the basis of the study. The Wiki is at and is called Principles of Family History Research. She went through Step 1, gave examples, and had good interaction between herself and the comments that were made on Dear Myrt’s Genealogy Community at 
She went over how she organises her computer folders by colors using the program Folder Marker at I think that I wll use that method because right now I don’t use any method. For example, I have my genealogy divided into surnames starting with Andrew Barclay, George Barclay, John Barclay, Cecil Barclay, and my father, Harold Barclay. But I will start to use file folders now. She also has a folder of paper which she had yet to put into appropiate surname folders.
So if you want to watch this seesion, it is on 
Remember to make yourself a member of Dear Myrt’s Genealogy Community before watching the YouTube Google+ Hangout on Air at 
If you haven’t done so alreay, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, January 5, 2015

Canadian Week in Review - 05 January 2015

I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media websites, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.


In 1727, James Wolfe, commander of the British expedition that captured Quebec in 1759, died of his wounds during the battle of the Plains of Abraham at Quebec.
To read more about James Wolfe, go to

In 1872, Canada and the U.S. exchanged telegraphic weather reports for the first time.
For more on the history of telegraphy, go to

In 1884, a railway collision at the Humber River, just west of Toronto, took 31 lives.
To read more about the Toronto streetcar system, go to

Social Media

(Video) Quebec man on a mission to save barns
   Roger Brabant of Rigaud, Que, a town on the road from Ottawa to Montreal, has started to take apart barns which have been slated for demolition, and uses the wood for his products – like cupboards.


Nova Scotia

Memory Lane Heritage Village goes high tech to boost tourism

   The Heritage Village includes a dozen buildings set in the style of the 1940s and 1950s, and depicts the typical life of a coastal Nova Scotia community.
Nova Scotia music contest honours Viola Desmond’s legacy
   The contest pays tribute to Viola Desmond and her contributions to Canada’s civil rights movement, and raises awareness of Nova Scotia’s Heritage Day
holiday honouring her on February 16th.

New Brunswick

Last official event held at Royal Canadian Legion Branch 28
   A long-time military tradition capped off the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 28's history on New Year's Day.
   The branch hosted its stand-to levee, with more than 250 people in attendance. It was the last official event before it will merge with Branch 628 to create a new organization in February.


Ross rifle maligned due to misinformation
   Terry Wieland, from St. Louis, Missouri (formerly of Peterborough, Ontario), a professional gun writer, writes a letter to the editor, in which he defends Lt. Ross Ackerman, by saying that he did not die from rifle malfunction.

Remembering the dead at Huronia Regional Centre
­   Remember Every Name, a committee of survivors and community members, is working on a plan to mark some 1,440 unmarked graves of former patients at the notorious centre for people with developmental disabilities.

Canada's history not always so 'strong, proud, free'

   The federal government's recent ad campaign distorts history, say some critics of the process.


What will Saskatoon look like in the future?

   Saskatoon could be on the precipice of getting a new look, say city officials, architects, and designers. But what that look will be is still open for debate.

Stories of the Year

One of the biggest stories of the year was the news that the Library and Archives Canada was going to digitize the service files of the First World War men and women, and put them online.
One suggestion that I would like to see as a researcher, in addition to being kept up-to-date, is that the LAC tells us where they are - up to which letter have the files been digitized? It would be easier to judge the rate at which they are doing the scans.
Another story has been the realignment of the Ontario Genealogical Society. They declared two branches “inactive” - Haldimand and Norfolk - and there were financial concerns for the organization, both due to lower levels of membership. It seems that they have stabilized themselves as a society, but time will tell.
The OGS has also transformed the publication of their journal, Families, from one that is a high-quality, paper-based magazine, into an electronic format, starting with the February 2015 issue.
A bit of good news for the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia, as it moved to its new headquarters in the wider Halifax area. See their website,
They will be starting a new eight-week course in February 2015 for beginners.
And the third news story of the year was the Canadian societies that are going online with Webinars, Live Streaming, and putting genealogy topics on YouTube.
And sites like who have put on 24 new databases and have updated 5 more this past year, and, who has put on or updated their databases covering Canada (thanks to the indexers).
So, it has been a good year.
And we just got word that Louis Kessler, a genealogist from Winnipeg, Manitoba, has just released his GenSoftReviews for 2014.
To read who won the best reviews of 2014, go to
In 2015, the big news, as Thomas MacEntee says, is doing the Genealogy Do-Over.
It involves a 13-week exercise where you look at your genealogy and decide if you need to go back and do parts or all of it over again, because the first time, you may missed putting in sound citations, or do exhaustive research, and now you have a chance to correct it.
You can follow the progress at a Facebook page at or add a comment at

So, we wish everyone a Happy New Year, and let’s make 2015 the best ever year we have had for genealogy!

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 12 January 2015.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

FamilySearch is looking for more indexers

I watched and listened to the Legacy Family Tree Webinar on Tuesday with Devin Ashby, Community Advocate for FamilySearch as he gave the talk Welcome to FamilySearch Indexing! The news is they are still looking for indexers. The webinar is free for the next seven days, so be sure to catch it at

You can go to to register to be an indexer, and there are projects that you can choose from at 

Meanwhile, British Columbia Death Registrations (1871-1986) at , and British Columbia Marriage Registration (1859-1932) at have been updated.

Friday, September 19, 2014 Campaign Aims to Gather Your Fondest Grandma Stories

This press release from FamilySearch sounds like a great idea - they will be gathering grandma stories from September 20 to 30th, 2014. They already have over 160 stories!

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—If you could share ONE story about your grandma, what would it be? That’s the question nonprofit FamilySearch International ( is nudging people worldwide to respond to as part of its worldwide #meetmygrandma social media campaign, September 20-30. FamilySearch announced the campaign today, seeking 10,000 stories in 10 days to kick off the global initiative where descendants are invited to share and preserve online or through a mobile app the fond memories or stories about their grandmothers’ charms or idiosyncrasies.

“Heart-warming experiences with a beloved grandmother are at the heart of many fond memories from our formative years, or even adulthood,” said Brad Lowder, International Marketing Director for #MeetMyGrandma campaign. “All you have to do is ask a person to share a special memory about their grandmother, and they immediately wax sentimental as they recount a heartfelt story or wise saying they cherish from a grandmother. We want to encourage people to capture for future generations those stories that make their grandmothers so special.” offers a free international service for families to share their family histories, memories, photos, and historic documents online and preserve them for future generations. If you are fortunate to have a grandma still living, the free FamilySearch Memories mobile app (IOS only for now) allows individuals to audio record their grandmother and save those recordings online. And there are 20 fun questions to ask your grandma to help write and preserve her personal history in her own words online.

“The #meetmygrandma campaign encourages families to have fun as each member of the family shares their personal perspectives of what makes their grandmothers so special to them,” added Lowder. Their stories, and those contributed by other family members and relatives, are saved to a dynamic online profile dedicated specifically to their grandma, along with any photos and digital artifacts submitted.

The launch of the initiative runs from September 20–30, but the campaign will run indefinitely. 

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Did you index yesterday?

The FamilySearch Indexing project yesterday had over 66,000 individuals who indexed at least one batch, and many did more than one batch of documents. Over 3 million records were indexed, and over 500,000 were arbitrated! That is a fantastic number.

And did you watch some or all of DearMYRTLE’s GeneaSleepOver Hangouts On Air on Google+ and archived at YouTube?

If you didn't watch, you can view the 24-hour session (divided into segments) at

So congratulation to everyone who indexed. It is not too late to start indexing today. Go to

There are plenty of Canadian records waiting to be indexed.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Join the Worldwide Indexing Event

FamilySearch is looking for new indexers to meet a specific goal that they have set for this month -  

"Join volunteers from around the world on July 20 and 21 for an international history-making event! The goal? For 50,000 indexers and arbitrators to submit at least one batch in a 24-hour period! Do more if you would like, but one batch is all that is required to be counted in the record!

This remarkable goal will require help from every current indexer and arbitrator out there, plus many new volunteers,* but it can be achieved if generous volunteers like you commit to participate. So mark your calendar and spread the word! Invite friends and family to join you. Organize an indexing party; create a fun family challenge or a society or church service project. Everyone is needed. Everyone can make a difference!

The record-setting begins at 00:00 coordinated universal time (UTC) on July 21, which is 6:00 p.m. mountain daylight time (MDT or Utah time) on Sunday, July 20. It ends 24 hours later, at 23:59 UTC (or 5:59 p.m. MDT) on Monday, July 21."

Example of some of the records that are waiting to be indexed are -
  • Canada, British Columbia—Marriages, 1937
  • Canada, Newfoundland—Vital Records, 1840–1949
  • Canada, Newfoundland—Vital Statistics Collection, 1753–1893 
Check the FamilySearch Indexing Page at
Check the FamilySearch Facebook Events page at for your local start time and status updates.

Postscript: The Canada Day Contest is on until July 15th. To enter the contest, go to

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Family History Libraries offers FREE scanning

You can now take your photos and other documents to your nearest Family History Library and scan them for FREE

They have recently installed a customized Lexmark multifunction product (MFPs) which quickly scan photos or significant documents and transfer them online to your personal genealogical space. The scanning system produces high-quality digital images in both .jpg and .png file formats and will accommodate up to 5 MB in size. Items may also be scanned and saved to a thumb drive, all FREE of charge.  

You can then identify people in the photos and connect them to respective ancestors in your FamilySearch Family Tree, and you can post links and share the information with other family members and encourage them to share as well. 

To see if there is a Family History Library in your area, go to

Thursday, May 1, 2014

British Columbia, Canada, Estate Files, 1859-1949

 Another case of the partnership between Ancestry and FamilySearch. 

Ancestry has the browsable images on their site, and you can browse by Judicial District/Locality, whereas FamilySearch has the background information that could help you to search estate files in British Columbia. plus browsable images.

So how is this system working? It brings the holdings of the FamilySearch site to a different audience, but Ancestry isn’t adding any new records by doing this. Are you satisfied with this change?

At one time apparently, Ancestry would only put on indexed records, now it appears that they have moved to include browsable images.

You can search the site at Ancestry

You can read the information at FamilySearch at

The images are at FamilySearch at

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

FamilySearch Online Training is NOW a Click Away

Kudos to FamilySearch because now you can now get training through the use of  their online manuals. 

Some of the manuals which are available are - 

The Family Tree Reference Manual 

The FamilySearch Learning Center (on this site is the 2014 RootsTech live streaming talks) plus other videos – and they are all FREE)

The Training Link

The Family Tree Quick Start Guide

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

FamilySearch has designated 2014 as “The Year of the Obituary’’

Now here is an exciting announcement that made at RootsTech 2014 -

The year 2014 has been designated as “The Year of the Obituary” for FamilySearch. We know that many family history centers have clipped obituaries from newspapers and we’d like to place these collections online on the FamilySearch website. FamilySearch will scan and digitize the collections. They will then be indexed and placed online. Digitizing obituaries will make these valuable collections easier to access and simpler to attach to FamilyTree. Information gathered from obituaries will help users to add people and data to Family Tree.

Here are some guidelines for what FamilySearch wants to collect:

· These records should be actual obituaries, not indexes.

· They must be camera-ready which means the obituaries should be attached to the same-sized cards (3×5, 4×6) or to 8 1/2 by 11 inch paper.

· If you have already indexed the collection and it is in paper format, please include that with your submission.

After the obituaries are scanned, you may request that they be returned to you or discarded.

If you have a collection you would like to submit to FamilySearch, please contact Nathan Murphy at

Friday, January 10, 2014

Announcing the New FamilySearch Indexing Website

We are starting to get press releases from FamilySearch and other organizers prior to the RootsTech Conference that will be held in Salt Lake City in February. This is the latest from FamilySearch regarding indexing.

They have a newly redesigned indexing website at, and they invite you to come and take a look. This new website integrates indexing with the rest of, making it easier for indexers to know how to get started and find the help they need.

They say that “FamilySearch indexing is the volunteer program that has already generated more than a billion freely searchable names on Changes to the indexing program over time have greatly increased the number of records that FamilySearch is able to publish. Projects that used to take years to index can now be completed in a matter of months, and as the indexing program improves, the availability of searchable records will only accelerate”.

Join at RootsTech in February to learn more about what's coming. Visit the FamilySearch indexing booth in the exhibit hall, which is free and open to the public, to get a hands-on experience with the new indexing program, or attend the session "Introducing the new FamilySearch indexing tool”.

The RootsTech: Where Families Connect website is at

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Canadian Immigration Records

I see where FamilySearch has added Canada Immigration Records from (1881-1930) to their holdings.

It contains records for the parts of Quebec City (1900-1921), Halifax (1881-1922), Saint John (1900-1912), North Sydney (1906-1912), Vancouver (1905-1912), and Victoria (1905-1912).

There are also records from New York City (1906-1912), and Eastern US parts from 1905 to 1912.  These are records of those names of passengers who had the intention of going directly to Canada.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

FamilySearch does it again!

FamilySearch has done it again! In addition to being partners now with, and MyHeritage, they have become partners with the new DC Thomson Family History, formerly known as findmypast. 

LONDON, England and SALT LAKE CITY, Utah--Annelies van den Belt, the new CEO of DC Thomson Family History, the British-based leader in online family history and owner of findmypast and Genes Reunited, has announced a major new partnership with US-based that will give family history enthusiasts access to billions of records online and new technology to collaboratively research their family roots.

DC Thomson Family History, formerly known as brightsolid online publishing, is collaborating with FamilySearch, which has the largest collections of genealogical and historical records in the world, to deliver a wide range of projects including digital preservation, records search, technological development and the means to allow family historians to share their discoveries.

More than 13 million records from launched today on, including major collections of births, marriages and deaths covering America, Australia, and Ireland. Around 600 additional collections, containing millions of records, will follow.

The two organisations have a long history of working together on historical projects, including indexing 132 million records of the 1940 US census and two hundred years of British Army Service Records (Chelsea Pensioners) in a joint digitisation project with The National Archives.

Van den Belt said: “This is fantastic news for our customers all over the world. As a leader in online family history we will be able to offer access to a much wider variety of records dating back hundreds of years and the first batch are ready to search on findmypast. The convenience of searching many treasures from along with our own extensive collections will provide rich new insights for our customers.

“This partnership with FamilySearch will accelerate the momentum of our next phase of global growth into new non-English-speaking markets and give more people more access to more records to uncover their family history. This really cements our position as a market leader.”

“We are excited to work with DC Thompson Family History on a vision we both share,” said Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch. “Expanding online access to historical records through this type of collaboration can help millions more people discover and share their family’s history.”

DC Thomson Family History is the British-based leader in online family history, which operates major online sites including findmypast, Genes Reunited and the British Newspaper Archive. It launched in America last year with its findmypast brand.

DC Thomson Family History has a strong record of partnerships with non-profit and public sector organisations such as the British Library and The National Archives among many other major archives and organisations around the world.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

This is an interesting press release because it shows an alliance has been struck between MyHeritage and FamilySearch. They say it will benefit all family historians. What do you think?

TEL AVIV, Israel & SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – October 9, 2013 – MyHeritage, the popular online family history network, and announced today the signing and commencement of a strategic partnership that forges a new path for the family history industry. Under this multi-year partnership, MyHeritage will provide FamilySearch with access to its powerful technologies and FamilySearch will share billions of global historical records and family tree profiles spanning hundreds of years with MyHeritage. This will help millions of MyHeritage and FamilySearch users discover even more about their family history.

FamilySearch will provide MyHeritage with more than 2 billion records from its global historic record collections and its online Family Tree. These records will be added to SuperSearch , MyHeritage’s search engine for historical records, and will be matched with family trees on MyHeritage using its matching technologies. MyHeritage users will gain access to an unprecedented boost of historical records and family tree profiles, which are key to researching and reconstructing their family histories. This reinforces MyHeritage's position as an international market leader, with gigantic assets of family trees and records, which are the most globally diverse in the industry.

FamilySearch members will benefit from MyHeritage's unique technologies which automate family history discoveries. Smart Matching™ automatically finds connections between user-contributed family trees and Record Matching automatically locates historical records relevant to any person in the family tree. By receiving accurate matches between FamilySearch’s Family Tree profiles and historical record collections, such as birth, death, census, and immigration documents, FamilySearch members will be able to more effectively grow their family trees in size and in depth and add conclusions supported by historical records.

“For more than a hundred years, FamilySearch has been dedicated to working with the world’s archives to preserve their records for future generations” said Gilad Japhet, Founder and CEO of MyHeritage. “Their massive undertaking has made family history more accessible to everyone. This partnership highlights MyHeritage’s technology leadership and our firm commitment to adding historical records on a massive global scale, accelerating our vision of helping families everywhere explore and share their legacy online. We look forward to a fruitful future working hand in hand with our friends at FamilySearch.”

“FamilySearch values collaborative partnerships that enable more people, in more places, to discover their family history” said Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch. “MyHeritage is an innovative company that has a fast growing, global online audience. We are excited to commence this partnership which enables FamilySearch to better serve the global family history community.”

Postscript: I would like to say thank you to the reader who sent me notice of this press release.