Showing posts with label Halifax. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Halifax. Show all posts

Sunday, July 28, 2013

War of 1812 and Nova Scotia


Ships Duke of Kent, Charles Mary Wentworth and Earl Spencer from a modern drawing by C.H.J. Snider. Medium: drawing Artist: C.H.J. Snider Reference no.: NSARM Photo Collection: Ships: C.M. Wentworth

The War of 1812 began in June 1812, and the remaining British North American colonies — Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island (then separate from Nova Scotia), New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Lower Canada (Quebec) and Upper Canada (Ontario) were automatically at war with the United States.

The role of Nova Scotia during the war was mainly at sea. The Royal Navy from its North Atlantic Squadron base at Halifax, joined by privateer vessels from home ports along the Atlantic coast and Bay of Fundy – like the ports of Halifax and Liverpool.

There are several virtual exhibits –

Spoils of War: Privateering in Nova Scotia – Read about the history of privateering in Nova Scotia. For example, there  are digitized original log-books for the privateers Charles Mary Wentworth (1799), Nelson (1802) and Dart (1813).

Acadian Reporter – This newspaper was published in Halifax beginning in January 1813, and this is four-page weekly newspaper. This newspaper “carried local, provincial, British and international news stories, a weekly almanac, shipping news, marriage and death notices, and a wide range of advertisements”

Black Refugees 1812 – 1834 - This is a virtual exhibit made up of 75 digitized documents, news clippings, documentary art and print items.


Go to http://gov.ns.ca/nsarm/war1812

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Battle of the Atlantic

                          
The Battle of the Atlantic was Canada’s single longest continuous military engagement of the Second World War. It took place from September 1939 to May 1945.

Today is remembered as the Battle of the Atlantic Sunday in Canada, and there will be many ceremonies that will take place across the country.

For almost six years, the men and women of the Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Canadian Merchant Navy fought the enemy in the North Atlantic to ensure vital supplies reached Europe.

After receiving more training, air cover, special intelligence and better equipment, the Battle of the Atlantic reached a turning point in May 1943

However, despite all efforts, enemy forces sunk over 70 merchant vessels, claiming the lives of over 1,600 Canadian crew members

Please visit the Flickr album that the Library and Archives Canada has put on to view the photos of the Battle of the Atlantic at www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157633223398662

Canada’s Naval History www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/navy/home-e.aspx The Canadian war museum has an online historical exhibit.

70th Anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/feature/battle-atlantic
The Battle of the Atlantic was Canada's longest military engagement of the Second World War, lasting from September 1939 to May 1945

Remembering the Battle of the Atlantic www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/straighttalk/archives/2013/05/20130504-160903.html The Sun News has a story of the Battle of the Atlantic "longest, largest, and most complex" naval battle in history

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Military Records - Discover your ancestor's service


The Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia will hold its monthly meeting on April the 20th entitled Military Records - Discover your ancestor's service. The meeting will from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at the Akins A/V Room, Nova Scotia Archives, University Ave, Halifax, NS

The talk will be presented by Col. John Boileau, CD (Ret'd, a noted historian and acclaimed author, Colonel John Boileau, CD (Ret'd), will deliver a lecture on how to locate, decipher and learn about military service records and what they can tell you about your ancestor's life.

And the office will be open on Sunday, April 14th and Sunday, April 21st from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm - 3258 Isleville Street, Halifax, NS . The office is open all afternoon! Drop in to chat, do some research or purchase a publication.

Hope to see you there!

Their website is at http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca

Sunday, January 13, 2013

Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia Meeting

Pam Wile the Editor of the Nova Scotia Genealogist newsletter from the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia tells us that they will be open today Sunday, January 13, 2013 from 1:00 to 5:00 pm. EST

They are located at 3258 Isleville Street, Halifax, and you can have a comfortable research space that includes a patrons' computer with internet access and a library. If you can't make it to their place, you can view their library holdings at www.novascotiaancestors.ca/libraryRecords.php


And she tells us that there will be a meeting on Saturday, January 26, and they will be having special speaker Nancy Wilson, and her topic will be Genealogy and Youth.

Nancy Wilson was the Coordinator for the intergenerational genealogy project: Genealogical Sleuths: Youth and Seniors Partnering to Discover their History developed by the South Shore Genealogical Society.

The meeting will be from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm in the Akins A/V Room, Nova Scotia Archives, University Ave, Halifax, NS.

Attendees are encouraged to bring along a young person - child, grandchild, neighbour, friend - to introduce them to ways to research their family history. Nancy will talk about ways to get youth involved that will inspire you to share your stories with the younger generation.

There will be door prizes and light refreshments will be served.

A selection of our publications will be on display and for sale at the
lecture.

To find out more about the meetings, go to www.NovaScotiaAncestors.ca

Monday, August 13, 2012

Families Who Came Through Pier 21

Anne Renaud, a writer of children’s book, want to talk to people who emigrated to Canada, and came through Pier 21 in Halifax in the years 1928 to 1971.

Anyone willing to share their family history with young readers is invited to contact her at earenaud@yahoo.com.

Should you wish to obtain additional information regarding her writing background, she encourages you to visit her website at http://annerenaud.net

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Africville Summer Reunion

This weekend will mark the 29th summer reunion to be held in the former land in north-end Halifax, Nova Scotia known as Africville – a place where American slaves, and other Black people settled in the 1830s.  

They will also dedicate the newly rebuilt Africville Church and Museum this weekend, and it will be the highlight of the reunion of the many American and Candian families which are expected to be there.


And you can read about The Africville Genealogical Society at http://www.africville.ca/society

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Holy Cross Roman Catholic, Halifax, Nova Scotia

The ChronicleHerald.ca, an online newspaper http://thechronicleherald.ca/HCW/1265125.html, has a story in the paper about Halifax’s oldest Roman Catholic cemetery.

The story says “Five years ago, Holy Cross, which is a final resting place for 25,000 people, had reached a state of disrepair. Many of the 2,500 tombstones near the corner of South and South Parks streets had been toppled and broken as a result of vandalism, weathering and neglect. In addition, the cemetery’s 150-year-old chapel was crumbling”.

The cemetery had been established in 1843.

The project was helped by the Charitable Irish Society of Halifax and An Cumann, a non-profit Irish association.

Holy Cross Cemetery Trust http://www.holycrosscemeteryhalifax.ca/history/index.html A volunteer organization which has worked over the past years to restore Holy Cross Cemetery and its historical Chapel, started and completed on the 31st of August, 1843 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Find a Grave http://www.findagrave.com/php/famous.php?page=cem&FScemeteryid=639382 There are two records on this site – the burial of Charles Robertson, and Sir John Sparrow David Thompson.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Park to be Renamed Africville

The Chronicle Herald's website, http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1255237.html has a notice today that “A historic north-end Halifax park will officially be renamed Africville on Friday (July 29th).

In a ceremony to take place during the Africville Annual Festival / Reunion, Seaview Park will be no more after Mayor Peter Kelly and other dignitaries unveil a new sign. The event will take place at 1 pm.

The renaming is part of a deal reached between the city and the Africville Genealogy Society in 2010.

Future plans for Africville include a church museum, expected to open in the fall, and an interpretative centre”.

The Africville Genealogy Society http://www.africville.ca/index.html Read about the history of the genealogical society, view a gallery, and read the stories of former residents.

Africville (on Wikipedia) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africville It gives a short history, and the resources that are available to the researcher.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Royal Navy Burying Ground - Halifax

CBC News had a story on their website http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/07/18/ns-royal-navy-burying-ground.html yesterday of a Royal Navy Burying Ground in Halifax in CFB Stadacona. It appears it has been there since 1759.

The news that caught my eye was that "Underneath another marker lie five sailors who served aboard the HMS Shannon — the British ship that captured the American frigate, Chesapeake, during the War of 1812".

It reminded me to spend some time doing the research of Henry BLADES, a United Empire Loyalist who was supposedly pressed into naval service by the British, and served on the HMS Shannon.

He had come from Long Island in 1784,and settled in Barrington, Shelburne County, Nova Scotia. He is the maternal ancestor of mine, but I have yet to do much work on this side of the family.

It is also interesting to note that the Americans gave as one of their reasons that they went to war with Britain was because they accused the British of pressing 10,000 Americans into naval service.

Thursday, December 25, 2008

Canada's First Christmas


This year will be Canada's snowiest Christmas ever, says Environment Canada's Senior Climatologist, Dave Phillips. There will be snow everywhere, even including the West Coast in Vancouver and Victoria, and on the East Coast in Halifax.

The first Christmas to be celebrated in Canada was in 1535, when French explorer, Jacques Cartier, and one hundred and ten men observed the holiday in a tiny fort at the foot of Quebec City.

So may everyone have a "Happy Holiday!", and we hope that Santa be most generous when he hands out the gifts!

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Library and Archives Canada Celebrates Human Rights Anniversary

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC)--in a joint partnership with the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR)--acknowledged the 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10th.

A Canadian, John Humphrey, wrote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 with the encouragement of Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of the U.S. President, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The CMHR has embarked on its first virtual exhibition entitled, "Everybody Has the Rights: a Canadian and The Words that Changed the World", and the LAC has been key in the launch of this inaugural exhibition.

As the press release says, "The LAC identified archival records, offered interpretive captions for each document, digitized documents for the inaugural exhibit and provided advisory services and support for copyright permission requests."

There are four area in which the LAC website can provide you with information on human rights, and they are -

1. The Chinese Head Tax - You can find original certificates and registers of Chinese immigration and links to libraries and institutions if you go to www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/northern-star/index-e.html.

2. Black History - You can go to the "Under A Northern Star" webpage and read the historical papers of former slaves, read about the events being held at the LAC during Black Heritage Month. or see the photo of Africville, the Black community that once was part of Halifax before it was torn down in the 1960s.

3. Ukrainian History - There are immigration documents such as the passenger lists and land grants which provide a picture of what life was like from 1914 to 1939. They can be viewed at
www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/framingcanada/026020-3500-e.html.

4. Aboriginal History - There are treaties records, Band and Agencies information, Government of Canada records, the database of Indian Reserves, Jesuit Records, Métis genealogy and the Project Naming web project on www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/aboriginal/index-e.html.

5. And you can go to the Canadian Genealogy Centre and view all the information there is there in a genealogical context in both official languages www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/index-e.html

Sunday, November 30, 2008

PaperofRecord.com sold to Google

This fall, a Canadian company named PaperofRecord <www.paperofrecord.com> was sold to Google.

The original owner of the site, R.J. Huggins, started the business in 1999 (it as known then as Cold North Wind) and started with the Toronto Star. He scanned the whole paper from 1892 to present, so if you want to read this particular newspaper, be sure to register (it's free), and go to the page that the company digitized. PaperofRecord has also digitized other papers.

When I heard the news, I went on the site to search the papers in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and I found the papers and the name that I was looking for - but the name was a name used for a particular wool in advertisements - so it was for naught. But I searched each and every page - so make sure you do the same or else you may have missed the name.

On most pages, the name you are looking for is highlighted in yellow, so it is easy to find.

The collection is made up of over 50 Canadian newspapers and 21-million images.

This is Google's first adventure into Canadian genealogy.

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil

Last night while coming home from the hockey game between the Ottawa Senators and the Washington Capitals (which Ottawa won - yes!), we drove past the National War Memorial at the corner of Wellington and Elgin Streets, across from the famous Chateau Laurier Hotel. It was 11:41 p.m.. Although there were no people present, the names of some of the 68,000 First World War soldiers were there on the memorial itself. It was the first night of Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil <www.1914-1918.ca>.

The project is to symbolically "repatriate" the Canadian soldiers who never made it back to their homeland, and to remember them on an individual basis, rather than as a collective during Remembrance Day ceremonies. The display which will be active in the evenings until Remembrance Day on November 11th. This vigil will also be held in Halifax, Fredericton, Toronto, Regina, and Edmonton.

You can look up the names of the dead on the website. You will find their surname, their first name and/or initials, service number, their rank, their regiment, their date of death, and the date their names will be projected on the National War Memorial.

In my case, I never had anyone die in the First World War but I looked up the surname of BARCLAY and found 18 soldiers who had died from 1916 to 1920.

The project was thought up by R.H. Thomson, a Canadian actor, and lighting designer Martin Conboy.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Springhill Mine Disaster - October 23, 1958

It was a terrible day in the long history of mining in Nova Scotia.

I was 11 years old when it happened. My Uncle Purly [BARCLAY] had traveled down to Jordan Falls (a small village near Shelburne) where my family and myself lived (the house was the Barclay home from the late 1880s). He had come from Halifax to do some bear hunting, and had heard about the "Springhill Bump" on the car radio.

That was the first thing he said as he entered the house - "Have you heard what has happened at Springhill?", he asked. We knew what he meant that there had probably been a mining accident, even though we lived on the opposite shore from Springhill.

We turned on the radio to the local station in Bridgewater, and listed to the coverage that night and through the next days until all had been found alive - 100 miners. Seventy-four others had been killed.

To get an idea of what the town of Springhill and the people looked like in 1958 as they went through the disaster, there is a virtual photo display at the Nova Scotia called the "Men in the Mines: A History of Mining Activity in Nova Scotia 1720-1992" <www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/meninmines>;
an account by the Canadian Press at <http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5gzJFLwRpsE618QhBzxBvzcRQhkpQ> and a website <http://web.archive.org/web/20041013211625/http://town.springhill.ns.ca/56_explotion.htm> that holds the account by Dr. Arnold Burden called "The Bump: Burial or Nightmare" - a personal account of a doctor in the town who went down in the mine to help those who were injured. Also on the same website <http://web.archive.org/web/20041013210859/town.springhill.ns.ca/Lost+Miners.htm> is a "Miners' Honour Roll" - an account of the 424 miners who have been killed in the mines of Springhill since 1881, both men and boys.

Believe it or not, there is talk of opening mines again in Springhill - but I think that is highly unlikely. Today, there is a museum where the mine used to be that you can go in, and a display which shows mining conditions in 1958 and the rescue efforts.

By the way, on the next day, my uncle did shoot a brown bear in the woods at the back of the house. I looked out and saw it but never went near it - I just thought that the whole scene was just too horrible.

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Newspaper Genealogy Column

I know that there are many templates that newspaper genealogy columns take, but one of the most popular are the columns that ask for queries from the readers.

And that is what Diana Lynn Tibet is doing with her newspaper column in several Atlantic newspapers.

But she would like you to send in more queries. She has a query published every week in the newspaper -- free of charge-- but she needs more to be published.

These are the newspapers that she published in -

Newfoundland - The Western Star, Corner Brook

Nova Scotia - Lunenburg Progress Enterprise & the Bridgewater Bulletin (includes South Shore counties such as Lunenburg, Queens, Shelburne)

Nova Scotia - The Bedford Magazine and the Halifax Southender (includes Halifax, Dartmouth, and Bedford)

Nova Scotia - The Amherst Citizen - Cumberland, Colchester, and Pictou Counties

Nova Scotia - The Guysborough Journal - Guysborough County

Queries can be about 35 words plus contact information, which includeS name, snail-mail address, and e-mail address.

Please send it to <tibert@ns.sympatico.ca>. Her site is at <www.thefamilyattic.info/Roots.html>.

Saturday, October 11, 2008

Voter's List at LAC

I can remember when I was but a youngster of voting age in the early '70s living on Olivet Street in Halifax, Nova Scotia, stopping on my way to work to read the Voter's List (a separate list was posted for each of the elections - municipal, provincial, and federal) stapled on the local telephone pole outside of the apartment.

I had to stop and check the list to see if I was there, and that they had spelled everyting correctly, and I was always there - and, yes, the information about me was true!

You will find information on the Voter's List held be the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) under <www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/022-911.006-e.html>.

You will find that the LAC holds the Federal General Elections Lists for the years 1935, 1940, 1945, 1949, 1953, 1957, 1958, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1979 and 1980 - only they are only available by microfilm.

You may want to check the Provincial and Territoral Archives who hold Voter's List for provincial elections, and there are many municipal archives who also hold voter's lists.