Showing posts with label New Brunswick. Show all posts
Showing posts with label New Brunswick. Show all posts

Friday, July 26, 2013

UPDATE: New version of the Census of 1851 (1852) database

The Library and Archives Canada has updated the 1851 (1852) census.
  
The 1851 Census marked the second collection of statistics for the Province of Canada (consisting of Canada West and Canada East). Information was also collected for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

In addition to searching by geographical information such as province, district, and sub-district, users can now also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age of an individual.

In Canada East and Canada West, the census was supposed to have been taken in 1851, but was actually take in January 1852. 

So, in the Canada East and Canada West, it will be the age of the person's next birthday in 1852, not in 1851 (Column 6).

Also, in Canada East and Canada West, there was an urban and a rural census, and they asked different questions. 

In Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, the census was taken between June and December 1851.


If you are having difficulty finding the person you are looking for in the 1851-1852 census, not all schedules survived.  

Go to   

Saturday, March 9, 2013

Dick Eastman’s Blog: Finding Acadian Resources in Books and Online

In Dick's blog this morning, there is news about a newspaper column written by Roxanne Moore Saucier in which she tells us about a great way to discover and read about our Acadian ancestors – through books and online.

As he says, “the term French Canadian describes those with Quebec ancestry, while Acadian refers to the French who occupied what is now Nova Scotia and parts of New Brunswick until the British deported them in Le Grand Derangement of 1755”.

You can read Dick’s full article at http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2013/03/finding-acadian-resources-in-books-and-online.html

To read Roxanne Moore Saucier column, see the Living Section of the Bngor Daily News at http://bangordailynews.com/community/finding-acadian-resources-in-books-and-online

And don’t forget the more than 100 family reunions scheduled for Aug. 8-24, 2014, during the World Acadian Congress, visit http://cma2014.com/rencontres-de-familles-prog.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

UPDATE: New Brunswick GenWeb


New Brunswick GenWeb has put on 55 cemeteries and has another 16 cemeteries updates - mostly in Albert County.

Thanks to Helena Lewis for doing this update!

You can go to New Brunswick Cemeteries at http://cemetery.canadagenweb.org/NB

Friday, January 11, 2013

Genealogical Classes at Tantramar Seniors’ College

This year, the college is offering 4 courses in this winter term, some of them for the first time.

Long Distance Genealogy Research – a Cooperative Workshop Approach - 9:30-11:30 am Thursdays with Barb Jardine in the Lafford Classroom, Sackville. First class: January 31st (4 weeks). Maximum: 15 (min. 10).

New Brunswick Irish History & Genealogy – 10:00-11:30 am Fridays with Linda Evans in Thomas Williams House, 103 Park Street, Moncton. First class: January 25th (2 weeks). Maximum: 10 (min. 4).

Now I Have Hundreds of Digital Photos – How do I Organize, Improve and Share Them? – 10:00-12:00 pm Wednesdays with Graham Hobster in NBCC Room A1133, Moncton. First class: January 30th (3 weeks). Maximum: 15 (min. 4).

Social Media Tools 101: Skype, Facebook and Google – 10:00 to 12:00 pm Thursday, February 28th with Brian Cormier & Dave Gallant in the Shediac Multipurpose Centre (one class only). Maximum: 12 (min. 6).

Information about registration on Monday, Jan. 14 from 4 to 5:15 p.m., please go to http://tantramarseniorscollege.ca

Monday, July 30, 2012

New Canadian Blog

We congratulate Betty on staring a new blog that is going to contain Canadian content, and it is called The Pye Plate at http://thepyeplate.blogspot.com.
Since she is a Mayflower Descendent, she will discuss ancestors who travelled from England to New England, and from there to the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and to New Brunswick.  
She promises that the blog will be mostly about her family, but she will post for anyone who is seeking assistance in researching their family.
Welcome aboard Betty!

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Children's Aid Society (CAS) Home Opened in 1920

Patricia Winans writes a weekly column for the Moncton Times-Transcript.

This week she writes about the CAS home that opened in 1920, and "The Children's Aid Home continued to be used as a shelter until it was closed in December 1964. It was later used as office space, a social club and a nightclub until it burned in 1990 and was demolished."

Read the complete column at http://timestranscript.canadaeast.com/lifetimes/article/1449455

She can be reached at aglimpseofthepast@rogers.com.

Friday, August 5, 2011

Canadian Vital Records Databases - Updated

FamilySearch Records has just released a summary of updates since they started to report the program in April, 2010. Two of the records have been updated since July,2011, and they are -

British Columbia Birth Registrations, 1854-1903 https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/show#uri=http://hr-search-api:8080/searchapi/search/collection/1307731 – These are birth registrations, delayed birth registrations, and delayed registrations of Indian births. 38,340 Records as of 23 July 2010

New Brunswick, Death Certificates, 1920-1934 https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/show#uri=http://hr-search-api:8080/searchapi/search/collection/1840145 Browsable Images of death certificates from the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. 76,812 images as of 29 July 2010

Saturday, December 6, 2008

Where is Home?

The province on New Brunswick has been a place that I have travelled through on my many trips between Nova Scotia and Ontario, so it was with great interest that I turned to the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick and their website, "Where is Home? New Brunswick Communities Past and Present" archives.gnb.ca/Exhibits/Communities/Home.aspx?culture=en-CA

The study of placenames is called toponomy, and there are more than 4,600 placenames of settlements, cities, and communities throughout the province. They are described completely, including why and how they received the name - by the post office, railways, and settlers for example.

Links are provided to 4784 land grants and other maps, and there is a total of 960 photographs and 600 documents about the founding, incorporation, and development of 144 of the communities.

If you go on the site, you will also find the latitude and longitude of the settlement, the county it is in, the parish it is in, and a map giving its location.

On the "Alphabetical Listing" page is the community of placenames, a county listing, an index, and a number of definitions on keywords in their description of the place.

The "Exhibit/Home" page brings an excellent history of placenames to the researcher, and at the end, it lists the books from which this information was taken.

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Canadian Census of Industrial Establishments - 1871

After 25 years of studying and working with the 1871 Canada Census, Elizabeth and Gerald Bloomfield of Guelph, Ontario have released the Canadian Census of Industrial Establishments.

They have digitized the industrial census from the 1871 Census of Canada - the only detailed industrial census returns to survive so completely from the nineteenth century. More than 45, 000 industrial establishments are put into databases on the website <http://www.canind71.uoguelph.ca>.

The website provides information for the four provinces - New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Ontario - covered in the 1871 Canadian Census.

I have checked the website and thre are the divisions which cover the businesses themselves, the people who were involved with the business, power (whether it be water, etc.), and the places where the businesses were located.

I discovered that a number of business in Shelburne and Kentville, Nova Scotia where my ancestors are from are mentioned, and I doubt that I would have ever taken the time to look them up on my own - now they are indexed by the Bloomfields!

There are barrel makers and shipbuilding companies that one would expect to find in a seaside town like Shelburne and businesses like agriculture in Kentville, a farming town in 1871. What this census does is that it presents a picture of the town that can help you place your relatives within the industrial mieu of the time.

And it can also provide material for the study of the technology, business and work organization of industrial activity, and the history of families, businesses and communities in 19th century Canada.

Well worth the visit, since it is the first time it has been done on such a large scale, and it does give a snapshot of industrial development in Canada in 1871.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Ancestry.ca Launches Online the "Canadian Passenger Lists 1865-1935"

At 10 o'clock this morning (on Tuesday, September 16, 2008), Josh Hanna — Ancestry.com's Senior Vice-President — announced in Toronto that it has put the Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 online at <http://landing.ancestry.ca/intl/canada/passenger/lists.aspx> in both French and English (simply click the language link at the top of the page).

I have been on the site (even though all of my ancestors came to Canada pre-1865) to see what it is all about, and there is 1,441 BARCLAYs who came to Canada and 178 BLADES. (To those who don't know - my father's line is through the surname of BARCLAY, and my mother's name was BLADES - both of them descendent from United Empire Loyalists who came to Canada in 1783 and 1784, respectivly, from the United States.)

The passenger lists covers the provinces and cities of Quebec (Quebec Ports, May 1865-June 1908, June 1919-July 1921, April 1925-November 1935); Montreal (April 1925-November 1935); Halifax, Nova Scotia (1881-October 1922, 1925-1935); North Sydney, Nova Scotia (November 1906, August 1908-August 1922, 1925-1935); Saint John, New Brunswick ( 1900-September 1922, 1925-1935); Vancouver, British Columbia (1905-September 1922, 1925-1935); Victoria, British Columbia and Pacific Ports (April 1905-September 1922, 1925-1935) and some eastern U.S. Ports (July 1905-1919, 1925-1928) and New York City, which covers 1906 to 1921.

When you put the name into the search engine you may get their estimated year of birth, their birth country (although many of the immigrants did not mention their country of birth), date of arrival, name of the vessel, and port of departure. You can then view the image from which the information was taken.

It appears that the partnership that was forged between Ancestry.com and the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) in May, 2007 was not adhered to in this instance because nowhere is the LAC mentioned in the Ancestry.com press release.*

But it may be worth checking the LAC site <www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/immigrants> because they have some of the passenger lists onsite, too. They also have the Moving Here, Staying Here. The Canadian Immigrant Experience online, and it's worth looking at it because it can give you the background behind immigration.

This past August, Sylvie Tremblay, Chief Project Manager of the Canada Genealogy Centre, said that the LAC has embarked on a three to five year project where they hope to develop a family history site where you will go to get the "story behind the headlines". They will make the connections for you between the databases, and the history in family history, and they are looking towards wikis to do this - so watch for that.

In the meantime, you can look up your ancestor on Ancestry.ca, and decide if you want to spend the money to do a deeper search. Remember, you can also get a 14-day trial at <www.ancestry.ca>.

*The LAC is mentioned in the CNW News Release. It refers to the LAC in that the LAC holds the official records on microfilm.