Showing posts with label Nova Scotia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nova Scotia. Show all posts

Monday, September 29, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 29 September 2014



I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media items, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada


In 1780, Benedict Arnold escaped one day after his treason came to light in what was to become the United States. Arnold, a major-general, and commander of the American Fort West Point, had planned to surrender the fort to the British. He became a colonel in the British army, and later lived in Saint John, New Brunswick. He then returned to England, where he died in 1801.

===================================================
In 1962, the "Garden of the Provinces" in Ottawa was opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

To read more about this park, that is opposite the Library and Archives Canada, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_the_Provinces_and_Territories
===================================================


Social Media


(Blog) The Recipe Project
http://recipes.hypotheses.org/4378
Valarie J. Korinek is the author of this blog, and a Professor of Canadian History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Nova Scotia

Delegates visit area for N.S. Heritage Conference
http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3879913/Delegates-visit-area-for-N.S.-Heritage-Conference/1
Pictou County, Nova Scotia hosted the Nova Scotia Heritage Conference.

History-Ed Coleman: First World War humour in Hansford’s stories
http://www.novanewsnow.com/Opinion/Columnists/2014-09-21/article-3875711/History-Ed-Coleman%3A-First-World-War-humour-in-Hansford%26rsquo%3Bs-stories/1
Born in 1899, the former Wolfville barber, Cecil Hansford, was 16 when he joined the Canadian Army to fight in the First World War.

Lighthouse mural by Yarmouth artist an attraction for Nova Scotia visitors
http://www.kingscountynews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3878832/Lighthouse-mural-by-Yarmouth-artist-an-attraction-for-Nova-Scotia-visitors/1
A Yarmouth artist has painted a mural of 144 Nova Scotia lighthouses that will meet everybody who takes the ferry from Maine to this Nova Scotian town.

New Brunswick

N.B.’s 104th finally gets its due
http://thechronicleherald.ca/books/1239446-nb-s-104th-finally-gets-its-due
Regiment’s War of 1812 efforts shown to be more than a footnote.

Quebec

The Treaty of Paris is in town
http://www.lifeinquebec.com/the-treaty-of-paris-is-in-town-10088/
Quebec City (Quebec) 23 September, 2014 – The Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War between France Britain and Spain. The actual treaty, that was signed on February 10, 1763, is on display at the Musée de la Civilisation starting today, September 23 until October 2nd.

Ontario

Excerpt #6 – The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/25/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
For links to the other installments, visit last week's CWR post at -
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/09/canadian-week-in-review-22-september.html

Canadian government joins 11th-hour search for John A. Macdonald’s precise birthplace
http://o.canada.com/news/canadian-government-joins-11th-hour-search-for-john-a-macdonalds-precise-birthplace
Barely 100 days before planned celebrations to mark the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth in Glasgow, Scotland, the Canadian government has joined in an 11th-hour search for the precise birthplace of the country’s founding prime minister.

Science and Technology museum closed until 2015
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/23/science-and-tech-museum-closed-until-2015
The Canada Science and Technology Museum will remain close until at least January 2015 because of mould.

Health unit looks back at its history
http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/09/22-sdhu-history-sudbury.aspx
A painstaking account of Sudbury's environmental history, going back to 1883, when Sudbury was only a Canadian Pacific Railway Outpost.

Here are the details on the RCAF’s new uniforms and ranks
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/here-are-the-details-on-the-rcafs-new-uniforms-and-ranks
The Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF) new uniform respects the contributions and sacrifices of airmen and airwomen who served – and continue to serve – with pride and professionalism.

Afghanistan added to Tillsonburg's cenotaph, dedication ceremony planned Oct. 7
http://www.tillsonburgnews.com/2014/09/25/afghanistan-added-to-tillsonburgs-cenotaph-dedication-ceremony-planned-oct-7

Local residents are invited to a special dedication ceremony at the town cenotaph on Tuesday, October 7th to honour members of the International Security Assistance Force who served in Afghanistan.

Alberta

Can we save McKay Avenue School? Or is our history doomed to be history?
http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/category/edmonton-commons/
McKay Avenue School, built in 1904, also played host to Alberta’s first legislative assemblies. Today, it’s a school museum, and on the endanger list to be torn down.


Alberta Aviation Museum receives historic air mail letter
The letter was part of the very first air mail delivery in Western Canada, flown from Calgary to Edmonton on July 9th, 1918 by Katherine Stinson, in an insubstantial wood and fabric aircraft.

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes
1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s
Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.


British Columbia 

Aboriginal tourism operator rebuked for opening burial boxes for travellers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/aboriginal-tourism-operator-rebuked-for-opening-burial-boxes-for-travellers-1.2774255
The actions of an aboriginal tourism operator in British Columbia who gave some travellers access to ancient burial boxes, including revealing the skeletal remains inside, have been condemned by his fellow First Nations.

Story of the Week




The society’s webpage is changing
(Editorial)

In years gone by, I used to go to a society’s website to see what was new with the organization, as well as its events,  latest publications, and their yearly executive.

There was so many changes I used to highlight it on my old news summary every week, and later, the Canadian Week in Review, but as time marched on, websites became less and less important, while on the other hand, the Member’s-Only webpages in the majority of a society’s website were becoming more important.

Then, about three years ago or so, the use of blogs by societies became the go-to media of choice for societies. But blogs quickly went out of style, mainly because they needed someone to look after them as people naturally graduated toward them. They needed someone to update them on a daily basis, and it became a hard job to find somebody within the society to take on that responsibility. And then Facebook came into the picture!

In a way, Facebook is their saving grace, because it can do everything that a webpage can do, plus it can add photos, videos, and other people can quickly comment on the posting, so it’s an "everybody" page. People have a feeling that the society belongs to them; whereas, the webpages and even blogs seemed somewhat distant, and there has to be a reason why only about 10% of the genealogy audience reads blogs, while as many as 70% read Facebook to see what is going on (according to a recent survey).

And now Google+ is making inroads on Facebook, although I believe that people are so used to Facebook now, it will be difficult to switch over to Google+. Most of the genealogists I know use Goggle+, along with a combination of Facebook, and yes, even blogs to keep up the date on genealogy news. And with the acquisition of YouTube, and video "Hang Outs", where you can actually listen to a person or people talk about one's favourite subject – Genealogy – it makes for a good combination.

So that is where I see genealogy going these days, until a new idea comes along.

How about you? Have you found that genealogy is cha
nging the way they get their word across to people? What have you experienced?

Let me know your thoughts, and I might post them in a future issue of CWR!

I can be reached at genealoygcanada@aol.com

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s theONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 06 October 2014.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

New home for GANS


I received a notice from the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia (GANS) (of which I am a member), that they have found a new place for their office in the Halifax – Dartmouth area of Nova Scotia.

They had received a notice of termination of their lease from their landlord dated July 1, 2014, and they only had three months to find a new office space.
As the notice says, “An earlier formed Premises Committee chaired by Vice President, Bob Davison and including Executive members Nathaniel Smith, Pam Wile, Jan Fralic-Brown, Holly Gunn and our Executive Director, Dawn Josey, was tasked with finding GANS a new home.

After an aggressive search, the Committee was successful in locating an office that meets GANS current and future needs.

The search committee established a set of criteria for the new location:

1. Room and structural integrity for expansion of research collection.

2. Quiet area for research.

3. Meeting and office administration space.

4. Separate room for processing and storing donations, acquisitions and our inventory.

5. Accessible space.

6. Lecture/large meeting room to seat 50 people.

7. Quiet building, suitable parking and street level visibility in high traffic/high profile area with potential for highly visible signage.

The Committee visited over a dozen locations throughout HRM. The office located in the Quaker Landing building at 33 Ochterloney Street, Dartmouth was the space that best met the above criteria. This 1731 square foot office will have a dedicated library area, a research room and a large meeting room where GANS can hold monthly lectures and workshops. library and collections will be protected for use by our members and the general public”.

So the new office is right downtown, just up from the ferry from Halifax, and is in the perfect place.

They plan to have an Open House once everything is unpacked, and you can
contact them through the Executive Director, Dawn Josey info@novascotiaancestors.ca.

The website is http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca/

The Facebook page is at https://www.facebook.com/NovaScotiaAncestors

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Annual Accrual of Historical Vital Statistics Now Available

My father (Harold Arthur Barclay) and myself (Elizabeth Anne Barclay) in the Public Gardens in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It was a favorite place to go on Sunday afternoons. 

I have been reminded by one of my readers that the Nova Scotia Archives has put on an additional 25,589 historical vital statistics on www.novascotiagenealogy.com

These records were released on 31 December 2013 and since then have been digitized, fully indexed, and checked for quality control. This year's accruals include 14,974 births (1913), 4,233 marriages (1938), and 6,382 deaths (1963). As usual, the birth records include some 'delayed' entries for individuals born in 1913 (or earlier) but not registered until a later date.

My surnames of interest are -

BARCLAY - Shelburne County and Yarmouth County  

BLADES - Shelburne County and Yarmouth County 

WEBSTER - Kings County

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

GANS to hold their Annual General Meeting & Lecture

  

The Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia will hold its Annual General Meeting & Lecture on Saturday, May 10 from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm at the Akins A/V Room, Nova Scotia Archives, University and Robie Strrets, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

The lecture will be given by Terrence M. Punch, and Terry will be talking about his latest publication, Montbeliard Immigration to Nova Scotia, 1749-1752. Do you have the surnames Bailley, Burgoyne, Boutilier, Dorey, Jodrey, Patriquin, Dauphinee, Jollimore, Langille, or Tattrie somewhere in your family background? 

Come hear about where they, and other Montbeliardais, came from. You may learn some surprising facts; for example, at the time of the immigration to Nova Scotia from 1749 to 1752, Montbeliard was an independent Lutheran state. 

Light refreshments to follow. 

2nd Annual Book Sale 

We will be selling back issues of the Nova Scotia Genealogist, duplicates from our library, surplus Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society publications, and much more. Bring along your cash and pick up some great bargains! 

You can check their website at http://www.NovaScotiaAncestors.ca, and their Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/NovaScotiaAncestors. Twitter is available @NSAncestors

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

UPDATE: GenWeb Cemetery Project

GenWeb Canada has posted updates to the following cemeteries in the provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec.

NOVA SCOTIA

Digby County

Waterford Cemetery

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

King's County

Peters Road Cemetery

QUEBEC

Huntingdon County

Hillside Cemetery

Labelle County

Chute-St-Philippe Cemetery

Kiamika Cemetery

Lac Saguay Cemetery 

Lac St-Paul Cemetery n

Ste Anne-du-Lac Cemetery 
 
Val Barrette Cemetery

Gatineau County

East Templeton Cemetery 

St Raphael Cemetery

Papineau County

Notre Dame-de-la-Salette Cemetery

Our thanks go out to Deb Belcher, Jim Anderson & Brenda Marchese for their help in the indexing, and to Angie Garant, Carol, Sharon Sireci and Cheyenne Kepke for taking the photos.

The full list is at http://canadacems.blogspot.com/2014/01/nova-scotia-prince-edward-island-quebec.html

Monday, January 27, 2014

Old Family Photo Workshop

On Saturday March 22, 2014, the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia will present a Photo Workshop as part of the monthly meeting to be held from 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm at the Akins A/V Room, Nova Scotia Archives, 6016 University Ave, Halifax.

The workshop will be lead by Jenny Milligan, MEd, Socio-Costumologist, and will cover -

  • Learn to date old photo
  • Place people in your family tree
  • Help identify faces from your past
  • Browse & study a collection of historic photo & costume reference books

Bring your old photos!

Cost: $25 ($20 for GANS Members)

Register by email to info@NovaScotiaAncestors.ca

You may email 1-2 photos with your registration.

Please note that only 20 places are available for this workshop.

The website of GANS is http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca/

Friday, January 24, 2014

Nova Scotia Census, Assessment and Poll Tax Records, 1770-1795, 1827

Ancestry.ca has taken the records from Nova Scotia Archives and under agreement with the archives, have put them online. 

The Non-Census Records in the Collection Nova Scotia Poll Tax Rolls, 1791–1793.
The index includes the name and location for each person. Records in this collection are from the following counties -

· Annapolis

· Antigonish

· Colchester

· Cumberland

· Guysborough

· Halifax

· Hants

· Kings

· Lunenburg

· Pictou

· Queens

· Shelburne

Tax Records

The tax records are from the Gideon White Family Papers. Gideon White was a loyalist from Massachusetts who moved to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, after the American Revolution. He served as tax collector for a time, and tax records for the years 1786–1787 are included in the collection.

The tax records provide names and addresses of Shelburne taxpayers, occupations, and county and poor taxes owed.

They can be accessed at http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=8809

You can also go to the Nova Scotia Archives at http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/census/ and read the individual narrative about each record, and go in-depth into the tax and census records for each of the areas noted above.

Saturday, December 7, 2013

The Nova Scotia Genealogist



The Spring 2013 edition of The Nova Scotia Genealogist with the lovely photo of the painting of the West Hants Historical Society Museum in Windsor, Nova Scotia is on the cover.

An article entitled Visit to West Hants Historical Society by J. Fralic-Brown on page 19 of the edition tells you all that you want to know what the museum holds on its shelves and in filing cabinets.

The main article is The Putman Family of Massachusetts and Nova Scotia by D. Armauda. 

The author says that the complete Putman family history has never been written to his knowledge, and we just get a glimpse of his work in this article.

He has everything sourced, and a very good genealogy explained in very easy to understand terms as he traces them from England, to Massachusetts to Nova Scotia.

They have included the latest books in the Reference Department of the Spring Garden Road Memorial Library, at the GANS Office Library, and the Scotiabank Family History, Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax.

To see more about GANS, visit http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca/ and their Facebook page at
https://www.facebook.com/NovaScotiaAncestors

Friday, December 6, 2013

Halifax Regional Municipality Archives

One of our readers recently sent me information about the Conversion List from the old street numbering system to the new street numbering system on the Halifax Regional Archives.  

Already the reader says that he has found it very useful and have already looked at several ancestors' houses on Google Street View using the modern address.

He continues on to say that “A lot of my family research focuses on Halifax. Whether using City directories, deed indexes, or death certificates, the civic address of my research subject is often listed and can be used for many helpful purposes. Between 1958-1965 however, the City of Halifax renumbered all civic addresses from a 2-digit to a 4-digit number, so if you're interested in locating the current site of a pre-1958 ancestor's residence you were out of luck”. 

So take a look at the site and the list.  

I had fun this afternoon looking at their Virtual Exhibit which featured photographs, maps, and anniversary events that have taken place in Halifax-Dartmouth over the years.


Thanks to Neal for sending me information on this site.

The website is at 

Friday, October 18, 2013

UPDATE: Nova Scotia 1921 Census

Here is the latest update from Dwayne Meisner -

Hi All, just wanted to let you know that many more sub-districts for the
Province of Nova Scotia have been transcribed. Halifax County is nearing
completion, with only a few more areas to finish,  and of course, the Town
of Dartmouth and the City of Halifax. Annapolis County has had more areas
finished, and I am expecting some more areas from some of our busy volunteer
transcribers, including parts of Lunenburg and Cape Breton Counties, and
others.

There is still a long way to go to finish the whole province. You
can view the completed areas by visiting

If you would like to help by contributing a transcription, see
http://dwaynemeisner.com/census/volunteer.php for information on how to do
it.

Or, if you have a Facebook account, you can follow the progress
here at



Sunday, September 29, 2013

MacDonald family history

Here is some news from Ron Zinck, who posts to the NSRoots mailing list quite often -

“I spent part of my Friday the Archives of Ontario working my way through
the collection of Rev. Ewen MacDonald. He worked for decades on Scottish
history and the McDonald family history. I have a number of scans that may
be of interest to researchers and I suspect I will have allot more after
every visit. This batch includes letters and a few charts that discusses
Antigonish, Cape Breton, and different septs in Scotland.

I hope that some of the MacDonald researchers will be able to help decipher, interpret and place these scans in context."

I uploaded them onto Google drive at this link
https://drive.google.com/?tab=mo&authuser=0#folders/

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Nova Scotia 1921 census is being transcribed

More 1921 census records have been added to Dwayne Meisner’s Nova Scotia site.

Some of them are -  

Bill Bruhm has transcribed the 1921 census for several areas in Lunenburg
County.

The areas are Northfield, which also includes West Northfield,
Cookville, Lower and Upper Northwest, Pine Hurst. He has also transcribed
the Chester Asylum, County Asylum, and the Indian Reserves.

In Halifax County, the following areas have been transcribed –

Lawrencetown, County Jail, City Prison, Sable Island Portuguese Cove in Halifax County, Ketch Harbour, Chebucto Head, Duncan Cove, Bedford Basin, Rockingham, Mount Saint Vincent, Hammond's Plains, as well as a few names from Fairview.

Tom Downing has transcribed the census for Seal Harbour in Guysborough
County. The census also includes Drum Head, Coddles Harbour

Alan Dinn has transcribed the 1921 census for Clementsport in Annapolis
County

Wendy Morash has transcribed the 1921 census for Peggy's Cove in Halifax
County. The census also includes Hackett's Cove, Glen Margaret and Indian
Harbour.

There are other areas that have been transcribed, and he adds to the site daily, so check it often.



Are there other areas in Canada being transcribed? 

Contact me at genealogycanada@aol.com, so that I can post them. Thank you. 

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Transcription of the 1921 Census

People in Nova Scotia are starting to take matters in their own hands, and they are transcribing parts of the census themselves.

For example, Dwayne Meisner has “transcribed the 1921 census for 13 Mile House in Halifax County. The census also includes Beaver Bank, Kinsack, Fall River, Windsor Junction, Lower Sackville, Middle Sackville, Upper Sackville, Lakeview.

Click on "Halifax" on the map to open the dialog window, and then click on
"Halifax County - 1921". If you are not already a member of my site, you will have to register to view the data. Registration is free.

It is available on his website at
www.dwaynemeisner.com

There are other people who are doing the same thing.

Diane Tibert has transcribed parts of the Liscomb census, also in Nova Scotia, at her blog Roots to the Past at http://rootstothepast.wordpress.com/1921-census.  

If you have done the same thing, or have done it yourself, and would like to put the fact out to everyone,  send the particular to me, and I will put it on this blog.



Sunday, July 28, 2013

War of 1812 and Nova Scotia


Ships Duke of Kent, Charles Mary Wentworth and Earl Spencer from a modern drawing by C.H.J. Snider. Medium: drawing Artist: C.H.J. Snider Reference no.: NSARM Photo Collection: Ships: C.M. Wentworth

The War of 1812 began in June 1812, and the remaining British North American colonies — Nova Scotia, Cape Breton Island (then separate from Nova Scotia), New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Lower Canada (Quebec) and Upper Canada (Ontario) were automatically at war with the United States.

The role of Nova Scotia during the war was mainly at sea. The Royal Navy from its North Atlantic Squadron base at Halifax, joined by privateer vessels from home ports along the Atlantic coast and Bay of Fundy – like the ports of Halifax and Liverpool.

There are several virtual exhibits –

Spoils of War: Privateering in Nova Scotia – Read about the history of privateering in Nova Scotia. For example, there  are digitized original log-books for the privateers Charles Mary Wentworth (1799), Nelson (1802) and Dart (1813).

Acadian Reporter – This newspaper was published in Halifax beginning in January 1813, and this is four-page weekly newspaper. This newspaper “carried local, provincial, British and international news stories, a weekly almanac, shipping news, marriage and death notices, and a wide range of advertisements”

Black Refugees 1812 – 1834 - This is a virtual exhibit made up of 75 digitized documents, news clippings, documentary art and print items.


Go to http://gov.ns.ca/nsarm/war1812

Friday, July 26, 2013

UPDATE: New version of the Census of 1851 (1852) database

The Library and Archives Canada has updated the 1851 (1852) census.
  
The 1851 Census marked the second collection of statistics for the Province of Canada (consisting of Canada West and Canada East). Information was also collected for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

In addition to searching by geographical information such as province, district, and sub-district, users can now also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age of an individual.

In Canada East and Canada West, the census was supposed to have been taken in 1851, but was actually take in January 1852. 

So, in the Canada East and Canada West, it will be the age of the person's next birthday in 1852, not in 1851 (Column 6).

Also, in Canada East and Canada West, there was an urban and a rural census, and they asked different questions. 

In Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, the census was taken between June and December 1851.


If you are having difficulty finding the person you are looking for in the 1851-1852 census, not all schedules survived.  

Go to   

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Battle of the Atlantic

                          
The Battle of the Atlantic was Canada’s single longest continuous military engagement of the Second World War. It took place from September 1939 to May 1945.

Today is remembered as the Battle of the Atlantic Sunday in Canada, and there will be many ceremonies that will take place across the country.

For almost six years, the men and women of the Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Canadian Merchant Navy fought the enemy in the North Atlantic to ensure vital supplies reached Europe.

After receiving more training, air cover, special intelligence and better equipment, the Battle of the Atlantic reached a turning point in May 1943

However, despite all efforts, enemy forces sunk over 70 merchant vessels, claiming the lives of over 1,600 Canadian crew members

Please visit the Flickr album that the Library and Archives Canada has put on to view the photos of the Battle of the Atlantic at www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157633223398662

Canada’s Naval History www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/navy/home-e.aspx The Canadian war museum has an online historical exhibit.

70th Anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/feature/battle-atlantic
The Battle of the Atlantic was Canada's longest military engagement of the Second World War, lasting from September 1939 to May 1945

Remembering the Battle of the Atlantic www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/straighttalk/archives/2013/05/20130504-160903.html The Sun News has a story of the Battle of the Atlantic "longest, largest, and most complex" naval battle in history

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Glace Bay Heritage Museum Society

The Old Town Hall of the Glace Bay Heritage Museum needs your help.

The Old Town Hall will mark its 110th anniversary this year, and the society will be starting phase three of the restoration project — the basement.

The foundation has seriously deteriorated resulting in mould, mildew and bad air quality, and the restoration will be cost nearly $400,000 to fix the foundation.

You may telephone the Old Town Hall at 842-5345 or send a donation to The Glace Bay Heritage Museum Society, PO Box 580, Glace Bay, N.S. B1A 6G4

Or you can go to the website, click http://home.seaside.ns.ca/~gbhms/gift.html

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Nova Scotia Genealogy Website Available in French

The website with nearly a million possibilities for people to search for their Nova Scotia roots is now available in French.

The Historical Vital Statistics website, maintained by the Nova Scotia Archives, has a searchable database containing nearly one million personal names. Each is linked to a corresponding birth, death or marriage registration, digitized and available online. The earliest records date from the mid-1700s and the most recent from the 1960s.

"One of the ways the province is making life better for Acadian and francophone families is by creating more access to bilingual services online," said Communities Culture and Heritage Minister Leonard Preyra. "The Historical Vital Statistics website is an invaluable genealogical tool for Nova Scotians to explore our family history and learn more about our culture and heritage."

The website is the only one of its kind in Canada that people can browse for records about their genealogy free of charge. The website is a popular destination for family history researchers and community historians from Nova Scotia and around the world.

To search for records on the Historical Vital Statistics website go to www.novascotiagenealogy.com. People can also purchase electronic or paper copies of the documents by ordering online and paying via secure credit card transaction.

The Historical Vital Statistics website includes records transferred from Vital Statistics after 100 years for births, 50 years for deaths and 75 years for marriages.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Ancestry.ca UPDATE: Canada, City and Area Directories, 1819-1906



As of 12 March, 2013, Ancestry.ca has 8,299,563 people in their database of Canadian directories.

TherThere are directories for Kentville, Nova Scotia, and Henry B. Webster is listed there as a barrister in 1867, in the Hutchinson’s Nova Scotia Directory, 1866-1867, and in 1869 in the  McAlpine’s Nova Scotia Directory, 1868-1869.

Henry B. Webster was the son of Henry Webster of Kentville, Nova Scotia, and Edwardiana Barclay, Shelburne, Nova Scotia, who was the only daughter of James Barclay and Catherine Bingay, the brother to my g-g-g-g-grandfather George Barclay.

So go to www.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=3789, put in the name of yout ancestor, and see what come up – you may be surprised.

Saturday, March 9, 2013

Dick Eastman’s Blog: Finding Acadian Resources in Books and Online

In Dick's blog this morning, there is news about a newspaper column written by Roxanne Moore Saucier in which she tells us about a great way to discover and read about our Acadian ancestors – through books and online.

As he says, “the term French Canadian describes those with Quebec ancestry, while Acadian refers to the French who occupied what is now Nova Scotia and parts of New Brunswick until the British deported them in Le Grand Derangement of 1755”.

You can read Dick’s full article at http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2013/03/finding-acadian-resources-in-books-and-online.html

To read Roxanne Moore Saucier column, see the Living Section of the Bngor Daily News at http://bangordailynews.com/community/finding-acadian-resources-in-books-and-online

And don’t forget the more than 100 family reunions scheduled for Aug. 8-24, 2014, during the World Acadian Congress, visit http://cma2014.com/rencontres-de-familles-prog.