Showing posts with label Quebec. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Quebec. Show all posts

Friday, May 15, 2015

An International Conference on Family History in Quebec

There will be the Roots 2015 Conference held by the Quebec Family history Society in Montreal this summer from June 19 - 21, 2015 at McGill University. 

If you are already registered you know you will be -

  • Attending The largest English Language Genealogical Conference held in Quebec  
  • Listening to speakers with extensive knowledge and experience in genealogical research
  • Attending an Opening Ceremonies with a Special Guest Speaker
  • Enjoying a Gala Banquet with a Gourmet Meal and Live Entertainment
  • Receiving Gift Bags that Includes a Complementary Course for Genealogical Studies from a National Institute
  • Browsing and Shopping at a Genealogical Resource Fair
  • Winning Door Prizes 

However if you are NOT registered, it is not too LATE.

The early registration prices for members and non-members have been EXTENDED to June 19, 2015

Registration is simple and payment can be made online or by cheque

Since you are receiving this email you are eligible to select the lower registration price for members.

Your Membership Number appears at the top of the mailing label on the back cover of Connections.

If you cannot find it, leave the number blank and we will look it up for you.

For more Details including Registration go to

Come Expand your Genealogical Knowledge and Have Fun 
PS: A block of rooms for visitors has been reserved at McGill University New Residence Hall. These luxury hotel-style accommodations are in the center of Montreal and are priced at $89.00 per day. 
Contact the Residence directly at (514) 398 - 3471 or by email

Need help in finding your Canadian ancestors?

As a nod of the hat to the Ontario Genealogical Conference being held in Barrie, Ontario from May 29 to May 31, may we take this opportunity to offer a month-long discount on our research and consultation services of 15% (ends 11 June at midnight).

Just go to Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services at, or send an email with the subject "special" to to see how I can help you find that elusive Canadian ancestor!
Research Tip!  Are you a cherry picker when it come to genealogy? When you see a name that you think belongs to your tree in an index, put it through a rigorous set of tests before you place the name is your tree. For example, is he/she from the correct place, and is he/she the correct age?   

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

75th Anniversary of Women's Right to Vote in Québec

It was on April 25, 1940 that it was sanctioned by law that women were able to vote and to run for elected office in Quebec.

Women had been able to vote in federal elections since 1919, but Quebec was the last Canadian province to pass the right to vote for women.

To read more about the right to vote in Canada for women, read

Sunday, April 12, 2015

The Story of Grosse Île – Canada’s Ellis Island

On Saturday, April 25, 2015, there will be a meeting of the Quebec Family History Society at the Briarwood Presbyterian Church Hall, 70 Beaconsfield Blvd, Montreal. Anne Renaud will present the Story of Grosse Île, and the lecture will start at 10:30 am.

From 1832 to 1937 more than four million people sailed across the Atlantic to the port of Quebec with the dream of creating better lives for themselves in the new world. During this period, a tiny island called Grosse Île, known also as the Irish Memorial National Historic Site, located fifty kilometers downstream from the port, served as a quarantine station, its mission was to prevent ship passengers from spreading diseases to the mainland. This is the story of the island, which served both as gateway and graveyard for thousands of people, and of the caring island workers who welcomed them to its shores.

The website of the Quebec Family History Society is at

 If you want to learn more about Grosse Île you can go to Immigrants at Grosse Île Quarantine Station, 1832-1937 at the Library and Archives Canada website at

You can slso check the database at

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed the last edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Monday, September 29, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 29 September 2014

I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media items, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada

In 1780, Benedict Arnold escaped one day after his treason came to light in what was to become the United States. Arnold, a major-general, and commander of the American Fort West Point, had planned to surrender the fort to the British. He became a colonel in the British army, and later lived in Saint John, New Brunswick. He then returned to England, where he died in 1801.

In 1962, the "Garden of the Provinces" in Ottawa was opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

To read more about this park, that is opposite the Library and Archives Canada, go to

Social Media

(Blog) The Recipe Project
Valarie J. Korinek is the author of this blog, and a Professor of Canadian History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Nova Scotia

Delegates visit area for N.S. Heritage Conference
Pictou County, Nova Scotia hosted the Nova Scotia Heritage Conference.

History-Ed Coleman: First World War humour in Hansford’s stories
Born in 1899, the former Wolfville barber, Cecil Hansford, was 16 when he joined the Canadian Army to fight in the First World War.

Lighthouse mural by Yarmouth artist an attraction for Nova Scotia visitors
A Yarmouth artist has painted a mural of 144 Nova Scotia lighthouses that will meet everybody who takes the ferry from Maine to this Nova Scotian town.

New Brunswick

N.B.’s 104th finally gets its due
Regiment’s War of 1812 efforts shown to be more than a footnote.


The Treaty of Paris is in town
Quebec City (Quebec) 23 September, 2014 – The Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War between France Britain and Spain. The actual treaty, that was signed on February 10, 1763, is on display at the Musée de la Civilisation starting today, September 23 until October 2nd.


Excerpt #6 – The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
For links to the other installments, visit last week's CWR post at -

Canadian government joins 11th-hour search for John A. Macdonald’s precise birthplace
Barely 100 days before planned celebrations to mark the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth in Glasgow, Scotland, the Canadian government has joined in an 11th-hour search for the precise birthplace of the country’s founding prime minister.

Science and Technology museum closed until 2015
The Canada Science and Technology Museum will remain close until at least January 2015 because of mould.

Health unit looks back at its history
A painstaking account of Sudbury's environmental history, going back to 1883, when Sudbury was only a Canadian Pacific Railway Outpost.

Here are the details on the RCAF’s new uniforms and ranks
The Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF) new uniform respects the contributions and sacrifices of airmen and airwomen who served – and continue to serve – with pride and professionalism.

Afghanistan added to Tillsonburg's cenotaph, dedication ceremony planned Oct. 7

Local residents are invited to a special dedication ceremony at the town cenotaph on Tuesday, October 7th to honour members of the International Security Assistance Force who served in Afghanistan.


Can we save McKay Avenue School? Or is our history doomed to be history?
McKay Avenue School, built in 1904, also played host to Alberta’s first legislative assemblies. Today, it’s a school museum, and on the endanger list to be torn down.

Alberta Aviation Museum receives historic air mail letter
The letter was part of the very first air mail delivery in Western Canada, flown from Calgary to Edmonton on July 9th, 1918 by Katherine Stinson, in an insubstantial wood and fabric aircraft.

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes
1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s
Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.

British Columbia 

Aboriginal tourism operator rebuked for opening burial boxes for travellers
The actions of an aboriginal tourism operator in British Columbia who gave some travellers access to ancient burial boxes, including revealing the skeletal remains inside, have been condemned by his fellow First Nations.

Story of the Week

The society’s webpage is changing

In years gone by, I used to go to a society’s website to see what was new with the organization, as well as its events,  latest publications, and their yearly executive.

There was so many changes I used to highlight it on my old news summary every week, and later, the Canadian Week in Review, but as time marched on, websites became less and less important, while on the other hand, the Member’s-Only webpages in the majority of a society’s website were becoming more important.

Then, about three years ago or so, the use of blogs by societies became the go-to media of choice for societies. But blogs quickly went out of style, mainly because they needed someone to look after them as people naturally graduated toward them. They needed someone to update them on a daily basis, and it became a hard job to find somebody within the society to take on that responsibility. And then Facebook came into the picture!

In a way, Facebook is their saving grace, because it can do everything that a webpage can do, plus it can add photos, videos, and other people can quickly comment on the posting, so it’s an "everybody" page. People have a feeling that the society belongs to them; whereas, the webpages and even blogs seemed somewhat distant, and there has to be a reason why only about 10% of the genealogy audience reads blogs, while as many as 70% read Facebook to see what is going on (according to a recent survey).

And now Google+ is making inroads on Facebook, although I believe that people are so used to Facebook now, it will be difficult to switch over to Google+. Most of the genealogists I know use Goggle+, along with a combination of Facebook, and yes, even blogs to keep up the date on genealogy news. And with the acquisition of YouTube, and video "Hang Outs", where you can actually listen to a person or people talk about one's favourite subject – Genealogy – it makes for a good combination.

So that is where I see genealogy going these days, until a new idea comes along.

How about you? Have you found that genealogy is cha
nging the way they get their word across to people? What have you experienced?

Let me know your thoughts, and I might post them in a future issue of CWR!

I can be reached at

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s theONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 06 October 2014.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Missisquoi County Canada Genealogy Research Volunteer group announces 10,000 record transcription milestone

This is a notice I received this afternoon from Nancy Cunningham, concerning her group, the Missisquoi County Canada Genealogy Research Volunteer Group. They are doing great work!

‘We at the Missisquoi Rootsweb group ( * Missiquoi was an historical county located in Quebec / Lower Canada / Eastern Townships along the US border) have been for the last 10 years quietly transcribing and publishing records much needed for research in our area. The Missisquoi historic county area, although located in Quebec was heavily Protestant & English speaking with many immigrants from Great Britain and US. ( Vermont) .

This week we reached the 10,000 image milestone on our transcription project of Quebec, Non-Catholic Parish Registers, 1763-1967 from Family . The 10k mark is for the number of images transcribed, the number of actual individual parish records of births, marriages and burials is closer to 15,000.

We make them all freely available and searchable on our blogs.

We haven’t limited our projects to Family Search digital records- we have also transcribed Library and Archives Canada microfilm Notary records, Google newspapers, Internet Archive eBooks of local directories and posted images and burials to Find-A-Grave.

We use an innovated volunteer sign-up sheet system through Sign up genius, this enables volunteers to work together on projects even though they actually live all over the world.

We believe strongly in paying it forward in genealogy and think this is a little way we can give back for all the help we’ve been given by others in the past.

If anyone has folks that once lived in our area, we’d love for them to search our records and maybe get involved with our group on Rootsweb.

Don’t forget how great Rootsweb ( mailing lists and message boards) is and it’s FREE – check the groups in your areas of research- they may be doing great stuff too!'


Rootsweb group

If you want to write to Nancy Cunningham, coordinator, her email address is

Friday, August 15, 2014

Quebec’s Civil Registers

Ever wonder why French-Canadian baptism, marriage, and death records are usually so complete, and that they go back to the 17th century?

Well, this year marks the 475th anniversary of the signing of the Ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts in 1539, which stated that priests were required to register baptisms and burials. In 1579, another ordinance was signed which required that marriages be registered. 

And in 1667, the Ordinance of Saint-Germain-en-Laye introduced a practice that has proven to be very important to genealogists – that is, the practice of keeping duplicate copies of the baptisms, marriages, and deaths. One copy was kept by the priest, and the second was filed with civil authorities at the end of the year.

Furthermore, in Quebec, civil status registers have the following characteristics -

· There are three types of acts: baptism, marriage, and burial.

· The acts are drawn up by parish priests.

· They are presented chronologically, usually within a single register.

· They are subject to two separate regulations: ecclesiastical and civil. 

The Library and Archives Canada has a very good website explaining Vital Statistics: Births, Marriages and Deaths at also has the Drouin Collection online, which contains Catholic baptisms, marriages, and deaths – including some Protestant records, also. 

Friday, April 18, 2014

Heritage Gaspe/Heritage Gaspesie presents “Generation Sacrificed – The Gaspe Soldiers of the Great War 1914-1918”.

Tom Eden will present a photo and information exhibit, which will be held at St. James Anglican Church, from July 28-August 2nd. It will consists of 10 panels, each with a different theme outlining the activities of the war and the sacrifice of the lives of these young Gaspesians. Tom will also be available to share his project with the community at a conference to be held on August 2nd. 

A tour of the old Wakeham cemetery will take place as well as a pamphlet on the history of the church will be made available. The exhibit is free of charge but a good will offering would be appreciated. All proceeds will go towards St. James Church.

The conference will be held August 2nd at 1:30 p.m. in St-James Church, Wakeham. The photo exhibit will be held July 28 to August 2, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. also at St-James Church, Wakeham.

Foe information, go to

Friday, April 4, 2014

Free Exhibit - Kids! – Children of the Eastern Townships between 1890 -1930

The Eastern Townships Resource Centre (ETRC) cordially invites you to attend its first photo exhibition Uplands Cultural and Heritage Centre, Lennoxville.

For the first time, the ETRC is opening its archives to share the treasures of several fonds and collections with the broader public. The exhibition showcases a small selection of the thousands of remarkable photographs in the ETRC’s collection. 

Kids! – Children of the Eastern Townships between 1890 -1930 is a photograph exhibition that displays the life of children in the Eastern Townships of Quebec and takes you on a journey back in time. 

The ETRC is thankful for the cooperation with the Lennoxville-Ascot Historical and Museum Society (LAHMS) for giving us the opportunity to display our photographs in this beautiful building. 

The exhibit will be open until June 30, 2014, and it will be held at the Uplands Cultural and Heritage Centre, 9 Speid St., Lennoxville.

The event is free to everyone. 

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Lost Landscapes: Up the Gatineau! with Google Earth

Join the Gatineau Valley Historical Society as they mark Earth Day with an historical virtual tour up the Gatineau River. Society President, Marc Cockburn, will take you on multi-media voyage from Hull up to Low and beyond, using Google Earth and archival photos and maps to reconstruct how the river’s landscape looked before much of its natural and built environment was flooded in 1927.

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 7:30 pm, at The Wakefield Centre, 38, ch. Valley, Wakefield, QC

The website of the society is at

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

UPDATE: GenWeb Cemetery Project

GenWeb Canada has posted updates to the following cemeteries in the provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec.


Digby County

Waterford Cemetery


King's County

Peters Road Cemetery


Huntingdon County

Hillside Cemetery

Labelle County

Chute-St-Philippe Cemetery

Kiamika Cemetery

Lac Saguay Cemetery 

Lac St-Paul Cemetery n

Ste Anne-du-Lac Cemetery 
Val Barrette Cemetery

Gatineau County

East Templeton Cemetery 

St Raphael Cemetery

Papineau County

Notre Dame-de-la-Salette Cemetery

Our thanks go out to Deb Belcher, Jim Anderson & Brenda Marchese for their help in the indexing, and to Angie Garant, Carol, Sharon Sireci and Cheyenne Kepke for taking the photos.

The full list is at

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Four new French-Canadian podcasts

Sandra Goodwin, an American blogger, now has four Podcasts on her website Maple Stars and Stripes at where you can listen to her talk about these subjects - 

Beginning French-Canadian Research

The Dreaded ‘Dit’ Name

French Pronunciation and Text-to-Speech Aids

More French-Canadian Name Variations

She says that they have been “created as a way to share tips and tricks that might make it easier to research your French-Canadian family here in America as well as to trace them back in Quebec. We’ll discuss ways to make it easier to move around in French-language records, especially if you’re not a native French speaker, as well as take a look at different record groups, repositories, history, geography, culture, and methodology particular to French-Canadian genealogy”.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau

The Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa has announced its first-time partnership with Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau.

It will be held this weekend on September 21, from 6:21 p.m. to 4:22 a.m., and it is Free!

Come enjoy the pop-up lounge, a temporary art installation and special exhibitions.

Too see what available, go to

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

350th anniversary of “Filles du roi”

Arrival of the Brides Library and Archives Canada, Acc. no 1996-371-1
The Library and Archives Canada released this blog post yesterday -
"Summer 2013 marks the 350th anniversary of the arrival in New France of the first contingent of the “Filles du roi” (“King's daughters”), young women who became the ancestors of numerous French-Canadian families. A variety of celebrations are planned throughout Quebec, culminating in the New France Festival in Quebec City from August 7 to 11, 2013. The website is at
Between 1663 and 1673, King Louis XIV supported the emigration of these young women, many of them orphans. Their passage to the colony was paid and they received an average dowry of 50 livres, along with a small hope chest containing clothing and sewing materials. In exchange, the women agreed to marry on their arrival in New France, to start a family and to help their husbands work the land. These women were instrumental in helping to populate and develop the colony.
The first contingent of 36 “Filles du roi” landed in 1663. Over the next ten years, an estimated 800 young women settled in New France under the same program.
If you would like to know whether one of your ancestors was a “Fille du roi,” there are many genealogical publications and reviews you can consult".
You can visit the website

Friday, July 19, 2013

Censuses of Canada West and Canada East, 1842

In this notice received yesterday, here are the 1842 Canadian Census for Canada West and Canada West -

“Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce that Canadians can now access the Census of Canada West, 1842 as well as the Census of Canada East, 1842 online. In 1841, Upper Canada was renamed Canada West, whereas Lower Canada became Canada East. These two jurisdictions are now known as the provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

Each census is partly nominal and contains the names of heads of family, their occupation and the number of residents for each family.

For the Canada West (Ontario) Census, go to

Thursday, July 11, 2013

A History of Canada by Montreal Metro

Samuel Wood, Montreal native who has returned to the city after being away for 18 years of studying and teaching in Britain, has a new blog called A History of Canada by Montreal Metro.

It’s a history based on the names of Montreal’s 68  metro stations.

He says he is “inspired by my fascination with the stories that shape the world in which I live”.

The stations tell the history of both France and Britain.

“Only in Montreal could you find Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix, a French Jesuit explorer and teacher of Voltaire, on the same line as Robert Peel, prime minister of Great Britain and the founder of the London police force”, says Wood.

To read his blog, go to 

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Lac-Mégantic Library and Archive destroyed in disaster

I wrote in the Canadian News in Review on Monday that the library and archives at Lac-Mégantic had been destroyed in the fires resultant from the train disaster. Now word comes from the chair of the board of Lac-Mégantic’s library and archives, that they were planning to move from the two-floor location downtown to a bigger facility this fall. Now everything is gone.

Reminder: Check out Canadian Week in Review every Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. The next Canadian News in Review will be Monday July 15 2013

Sunday, June 23, 2013

Research: Information needed on abandoned or deserted buildings

Esther Pilon, a journalist and researcher from Quebec, is working on a documentary series produced by Baroque (a production company in Quebec), and she wants information on abandoned or deserted buildings in the province. The series will be broadcasted on the Historia channel in 2015.

She is looking for abandoned or deserted buildings that have either been closed recently or for some time some examples are: farms, houses, factories, country homes, chapels or churches, stores etc…

Her goals is to hopefully be able to show these places in their historic and anthropological perspective. The documentary series will present these places with the input of antique specialists and historians. Also, she would like to meet and talk with people who have worked as employees in the factories or lived in the houses and or country homes, or know the places as past clients, student or attended the churches. 

For every abandoned place there are human stories.

This documentary series is a project of Baroque, a documentary producer from Montreal. Their recent projects include a history of taverns that will be broadcasted on Historia in 2014.

To send your information or to contact Esther, please either write to her at  6255 St-Vallier, Montréal, H2S 2P6, or at . Her  . telephone number: 514-967-9541.

Historia TV Channel is at

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Want to track down descendants of immigrants who were on the Empress of Ireland

A display of the sinking of the Empress of Ireland in the St. Lawrence River will tour across Canada in hope of tracking down descendants of immigrants who came to Canada onboard the ship. 

Here is the press release - 

TORONTO, May 24, 2013 - Is your last name Clark, Johnson or Smith? Do you know if your ancestors came to Canada onboard the Empress of Ireland? Would you like to know more about this Canadian Pacific Railway Company's ship?

On May 26th in Toronto, following the 99th Anniversary memorial service organized by The Salvation Army's Historical Society to commemorate the sinking of the Empress of Ireland, the "Site historique maritime de la Pointe au Père" (SHMP) will launch a national tour to trace down descendants of immigrants who came to Canada onboard the Empress of Ireland.

For a week, starting on Monday May 27th, at The Salvation Army's Territorial Headquarters for Canada and Bermuda (2 Overlea Boulevard, Toronto), you will learn everything about the fascinating but tragic story of the great ship that disappeared in 14 minutes on May 29th 1914 at 1 h 55 am in the frigid waters of the St. Lawrence River near Rimouski. 1477 people were on board, 1012 of them died. This disaster, overshadowed by the outbreak of the First World War, remains, to this day, the largest maritime disaster in Canadian waters.

A visual stand showing the ship in all its 1914 glory will showcase may pictures of the magnificent ship's interiors as well as a reconstitution of the disaster and rarely seen video footage of the underwater wreck. Documents and interesting information related to the exhibit will also be on display, including the list of onboard passengers from 1906 to 1914, the passenger list at the moment of the tragedy, a log book relating the ship's history and a complete calendar of all remembrance activities to be organized. Over ten cities across Canada will welcome this truly unique exhibition.

In 1914 The Salvation Army shared in the national tragedy of the sinking of The Empress of Ireland in the St. Lawrence. On board were more than 150 members of the Canadian Salvation Army, bound for a major international gathering in London, England. Most of them, including the national commander and members of the Canadian Staff Band, were drowned.

As the exhibit travels across Canada, Mrs. Pascale St-Amand, project manager, will be on hand to answer any questions from all visitors interested in this important page of Canadian history. Mrs. St-Amand will also keep a record of all the information and details visitors share with her regarding the hundreds of stories from immigrants who adopted this country at the beginning of the 20th century.

Come tell us your story!

Saturday, May 11, 2013

Brome County Historical Society (BCHS)

They will be holding the opening of the Brome County Historical Society Museum, in Knowlton, Quebec, on May 19th at 12:00 noon.

They will be celebrating the opening of the new season and the introduction of this year’s Scottish theme.

Live entertainment on the museum grounds, guided museum tours, refreshments plus, wine tasting from three local vineyards. Bring your family and friends for an afternoon at the museum to launch our 2013 Season and feel the winds of change.

There will be also be Wine Tasting at 4:30 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.

They are located at exit 90 off the AutoRoute 10, follow route 243 into Knowlton (Lac Brome) 130 Lakeside, Knowlton, Quebec.

They have been in existence since 1919, and they have a collection of books, manuscripts, photographic images, newspaper clippings, obituaries and an index of of 225,000 names are maintained in the
Local History and Genealogy Center.

The website is at

Friday, May 10, 2013

Mapping The Mosaic

Have you been to this site yet? I visited it today, and recommend that you take a minute to look at it, because it holds some interesting stories.

Here is what the press release says -

"This easy-to-use, community-driven site is designed to chart the collected memories of English-speaking communities in the Greater Montreal Area.

Users can share experiences of where their history happened by pinning stories, photos or video to an interactive map of neighbourhoods around Montreal and its suburbs.

No point is too small! Educators, historical and cultural groups, and interested individuals are invited to explore, discover and contribute.

Childhood memories of life on your street? Archival photos of lost buildings? Little-known episodes in the life of a neighbourhood school, place of worship or local hangout? Memories of colourful characters or local sports heroes? The grand achievements of entrepreneurs, artists, or innovators?

Mapping the Mosaic is a “people’s history” that welcomes all these and more".

Visit Mapping the Mosaic to begin telling your favourite Montreal stories!

Click here for the website

The Facebook page is