Showing posts with label Second World War. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Second World War. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Veterans Week - Cape Bretoners in World War Two

Wayne Macvicar, from Cape Breton (Nova Scotia), has emailed that
his site - Cape Bretoners in World War Two has just gone through an update.

The site contains an additional 16 individuals for a total of 16, 077 and 261 new pages for fatal casualties in the period Jan-Jul 1944, with photos for 19 individuals that are not on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial site.

He says that “Although I feel I'm getting close to completing the number of individuals that served I only have the bare information for many of them, including those that died in service. I invite everyone to have a look at my site and if they have any information they would like to share to fill out the form I have provided on my general Cape Bretoners at War https://sites.google.com/site/cbatwar/ site”.

To visit his sites, go to Cape Bretoners at War: https://sites.google.com/site/cbatwar/ and
Cape Bretoners in World War Two: https://sites.google.com/site/cbinww2/

Wayne thanks you for your input. It is very much appreciated.

(C) Veterans Affairs Canada

Postscript: This year during Veterans Week (November 5 – 11th), we remember Canada's Veterans - Brave and Proud.

Thank a Veteran by sending a Postcard for Peace at http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/veterans-week/postpeace

Friday, January 25, 2013

A Graphic History of Canada at War

Remember when graphic books were only for the younger set?

Well, writers and graphic artists wondered if adults would be interested in graphic books. Could they become involved with subjects that would interest them – for example, the Second World War.

So a new graphic book called Canada at War, reviewed by Ottawa’s Tim Cook, takes us into the Second World War where Canada sent 1.1 million soldiers in uniform from 1939 to 1945, and they fought on land, at sea, and in the air around the world.

Read the review as Tim explores the strengths and weaknesses of this book.

Read the review at Canada’s Historic Magazine at www.canadashistory.ca/Books/Lire-sur-l%E2%80%99histoire/Reviews/Canada-at-War--A-Graphic-History-of-World-War-Two.aspx

© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Friday, December 21, 2012

Toys and Games in Canada


The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) sent out this notice yesterday about the history of toys in Canada, and pictures on their Flickr album -

"The joyful holiday season is the perfect time to introduce you to the Library and Archives Canada collection of photographs related to games and toys.

Although toys and games have existed since the dawn of time, it was only in the 19th century that the ‟toy” really came into its own in Canada. It was also during the Victorian era that toys and diversion were deemed beneficial to children, thereby kick-starting the mass production of playthings. At first, toys mainly came from England, Germany and the United States, but between 1860 and 1915, some 20 Canadian companies began to manufacture them as well. They were made of wood and generally mimicked miniature furniture, cars or horses.

The First World War slowed toy production in Europe, giving the Canadian toy industry the opportunity to flourish. New toys were produced, particularly battleships and construction sets. This is also when manufacturers started using a wider variety of materials, which resulted in copper, tin, iron, lead, and rubber toys. Plush dolls and animals, small lead soldiers, bugles and trumpets, rubber balls, hockey pucks and even humming tops could also be found.

In the 1940s, plastic was introduced in toy manufacturing; it was used to make rattles, beach toys, tractors, trucks and construction sets, as well as an array of tools. In subsequent years, large multinational companies emerged and completely diversified the toy-making industry".

Various outdoor games, such as croquet and lawn bowling have become popular. Children also enjoy games of strength, string, and chance, which are featured in our new Flickr album at www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/sets/72157631912501393

Thursday, August 9, 2012

70 Years Since the Dieppe Raid

It has been 70 years since the Dieppe Raid of the Second World War, and Canadians are taking part in the ceremonies -

“Prime Minister Stephen Harper today announced that His Excellency, the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada, will attend ceremonies in Dieppe, France, from August 19 to 20, to mark the 70th Anniversary of the Dieppe Raid.

The Governor General will join the Honourable Steven Blaney, Minister of Veterans Affairs, who will lead an official delegation to France from August 17 to 21, which includes Veterans who participated in the Dieppe Raid.

While in France, the Governor General, Minister Blaney and the Canadian delegation will attend a number of commemorative ceremonies including the Government of Canada’s signature event at Canada Memorial Square on August 19 and a ceremony at the Pourville Memorial on August 20.

In addition to the ceremonies taking place in France, there will also be a ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, as well as a number of events in communities across the country.

The raid on Dieppe, France, on August 19, 1942, was a pivotal moment in the Second World War. With virtually all of continental Europe under German occupation, the Allied forces faced a well-entrenched enemy. A method had to be found to create a foothold on the continent, and the raid on Dieppe offered invaluable lessons for the successful D-Day invasion in 1944, saving countless lives in that momentous offensive.

The Dieppe Raid was particularly devastating to the Canadian military. Of the nearly 5,000 Canadians who embarked on the operation, less than half returned to England, many of whom were wounded. There were 1,946 prisoners of war and 913 who lost their lives.

The Canadians who fought in the Dieppe Raid sacrificed much in their efforts to help bring freedom and democracy to the people of France and Europe. Their task was a difficult and costly one, but their effort was not in vain.

Lest we forget”

To read more about Canada and the Dieppe Raid, go to www.canadaatwar.ca/page53.html

Friday, April 27, 2012

2012 Vintage Wings of Canada Flight

Yesterday, a press release was received by this blog, and it says -

On behalf of the Honourable Steven Blaney, Minister of Veterans Affairs, the Honourable Laurie Hawn, Member of Parliament for Edmonton Centre, took part this evening in the launch of the 2012 Vintage Wings of Canada flight season at the Gatineau Airport. The aviation enterprise is dedicated to promoting and preserving the history of Canadian aviation
"Vintage Wings of Canada does important work in preserving and better enabling us to understand the role and history of Canadian aviation in the development of our country," said Honourable Blaney.
Vintage Wings of Canada brings together aviators and aviation enthusiasts, who maintain a fleet and participate in flight activities and the promotion of Canada's aviation heritage. The organization offers educational programs and guided tours (by reservation only) of its collection, exhibited in their hangar at the Gatineau Airport. Veterans and members of the Canadian Armed Forces are welcome at all times. 
Veterans Affairs Canada maintains on its Web site at www.veterans.gc.ca archived videos that capture the personal experiences of women and men who have served Canada in times of conflict, including Canadian aviators.
Earlier this month, Minister Blaney and MP Hawn announced a $100,000 contribution toward the creation of a new Bomber Command Memorial to be unveiled this June in London's Green Park in the United Kingdom.
During the Second World War, while the Royal Air Force Fighter Command defended the United Kingdom against aerial attacks, approximately 50,000 Canadian service men and women were part of the Bomber Command, which attacked the enemy's military strength by bombing key targets in an attempt to weaken its military and industrial capabilities.
To see Vintage Wings of Canada's calendar of events, visit www.vintagewings.ca.

Monday, August 8, 2011

PoW Camp in Winnipeg

The Whitewater PoW Camp Archaeology Project http://whitewaterpowcamp.com/ is the site where German prisoners of war spent much of the Second World War in Manitoba.

The archaeology dig is at Riding Mountain National Park, located about 300 kilometres northwest of Winnipeg, where the Whitewater PoW camp was located.

The camp housed about 500 people. About 450 German Afrika Korps soldiers were sent to the camp after their capture in October 1943 during the Second Battle of El-Alamein in Egypt. They were kept at the camp until October 1945.

There is a list of some of the POW camps in Canada (There were some 40 camps)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_POW_camps_in_Canada

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Peace Tower & Books of Remembrance

On Friday evening, my husband and myself attended a Mixed Mess Dinner at the Rideau Canal Junior Ranks Mess in Ottawa, Ontario, during which we welcomed and feted Second World War and Korean Conflict (War) veterans as guests of the mess.

It gave me time to reflect on what I had done during that day (reading the First World War diary entries on the Library and Archives Canada website) as the veterans were introduced, and as they said a few words to the assembled.

It was the first mixed mess I had been to, and when they stood—and drank toasts to the Queen and the three branches of service with their dram of port—it felt as if I was back in the olden days of the armed forces.

We weren't that far from Parliament Hill that evening, and as part of the Parliament Buildings, the cornerstone for the Peace Tower was laid by His Royal Highness Edward, Prince of Wales (King Edward VIII) in 1919 as a salute to the soldiers who had died in the First World War.

The Tower contains the Books of Remembrance - all seven of them* - and a page is turned each day at 11:00 a.m. <www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm?source=collections/books/listing>.

The Memorial Chamber is where the books are located, and there is an observation gallery where one can see different views of the city.

*The seven books are:

- First World War
- Second World War
- Newfoundland
- The Korean War
- South African War/Nile Expedition
- The Merchant Navy
- In Service of Canada

Monday, September 8, 2008

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Releases Second World War Service Files

I have been waiting patiently for the LAC to release the Second World War Service Files of the Canadian Armed War (1939-1945) Dead.

I first found out about the database in the spring of this year, and last week, Sylvie Tremblay, Chief Project Head of the Canada Genealogy Centre, said that they were finally on the website.

Of the 1,159,000 men and women who served in the war, 44,093 died.

If you go to the site at <www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/war-dead/index-e.html> and put in a last name, you will get the date of birth, date on death, and the service number of the member.

If that is not enough information, you can press on the name and — in addition to the information already given — also get their rank, the unit in which they served, what force they were in (army, navy, air force), and the reference and volume numbers of the reference.

There has been some criticism of the database because you won't see the person's address on the record - so if there are two people with the same name, you will need to know the date of death of the person you are researching.

I had two uncles on my father's side (BARCLAY) who were in the war. Luckily, they made it through. My father did go to the depot in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia to join, but was refused because of his knees, and so didn't go to war.

John (Johnnie) was in the Canadian Navy and sailed on the convoy ships during the war, and Perley was in the Canadian Army and fought in Sicily.

I also had two brothers on my mother's side (BLADES) who were in the war. Walter and Arthur were in the Canadian Army in Europe.