Showing posts with label archives. Show all posts
Showing posts with label archives. Show all posts

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Guelph Museum - Your stories live here

The Guelph Civic Museum in Guelph, Ontario will host an exhibit Ordinary Lives, Extraordinary Times: Italian Canadian Experiences During WWII. This exhibit opens next Friday, with a reception starting at 6.30 p. m.

More than 31,000 Italian-Canadians were designated "enemy aliens" and around 600 were removed from their homes and held in prisons and camps. Many also lost jobs or experienced racism and violence in their communities.

And while you are there, why not take the time to look at their archives (many of which are already online – and there are photos, objects, papers at 

The museum was started back in the 1960s, and moved to 52 Norfolk Street, the former Loretto Convent in 2012.

Their website is at

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012. 

Cape Beaton Institute Digital Archives

This website provides access to the digital collections of the Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia.

The Digital Archives is an online database that contains archival descriptions from the holdings of the Beaton Institute.

Notice that there are places in Cape Breton here at that you can search, as well, as people and organizations at, and there is  full archival descriptions at

The website is at

Happy Researching!

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

What is Canada's largest non-governmental archives?

The Glenbow Archives in Calgary, Alberta is Canada's largest non-governmental archival repository. It has extensive holdings of unpublished documents and photographs related to the history of Western Canada.

The website says that it “houses a wide-ranging collection of unpublished archival records (such as diaries, letters, minute books, photographs, scrapbooks, speeches, membership lists, films, and sound recordings) for over 3,000 individuals, families, clubs, businesses, schools, and organizations in Calgary, southern Alberta and Western Canada.

The records, date from the 1860s to the 1990s, and the areas of specialty include First Nations (especially Blackfoot), Mounted Police, pioneer life, ranching and agriculture, the petroleum industry, politics (especially the farmers' movement), labour and unions, women, the arts (especially theatre), and businesses”.

To visit the Glenbow Museum, go to

The Facebook page is at

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Ever been to Genealogy Summer Camp?

One of the highlights of the summer was going Summer Camp, wasn't it?

Well, did you know that Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society has had a Genealogy Summer Camp for almost twenty years?

If you didn't know, but would like to find out more about the summer camp, you can contact Jane MacNamara at her blog for details.

Toronto Branch has been running this innovative program for almost two decades now - they invite out-of-town researchers to Toronto for a full week of concentrated family history research at our wonderful libraries and archives, under the guidance of local experts. More than 140 participants from England, right across Canada and many US states have attended over the years.

Local residents are welcome too, and may choose to stay with the group or attend as “day-campers”.

This year’s Genealogy Summer Camp will run from Sunday 7 June to Friday 12 June 2015.

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

 It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Friday, February 20, 2015

Milo, Alberta Library Archives

The Milo Library Archives in Alberta has been working to put online their inventory of all historical documents.

There are plenty of descriptions of what has been done in the village over the years, including background information on groups like the Milo and District Agricultural Society, the Milo Ice Committee and the village newspaper called the Canopener.

News is that the efforts to continue digitizing and cataloguing the Milo and area history are ongoing. There are hopes to next tackle Milo area community organizations from Queenstown to Majorville, as well as schools and Lake McGregor.

You can visit to look through all the material that has been uploaded so far.

Congratulations to Milo for taking this iniatitive, and good luck in seeing this project through to the end.

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Wellington County Museum and Archives

What a museum and archives! What a fantastic website!

Wellington County Museum and Archives is located in Fergus, Ontario, and is housed in the former House of Industry in Canada, otherwise known as the Poor House, or as a place of refuge for the poor, homeless, and destitute people in Wellington County.

It operated as a Poor House and Industrial Farm until 1947, when it became a County Home for the Aged. Later, it was transformed into the Wellington County Museum and Archives. A new Archives wing opened in 2010.

They have records of interest to those people who have ancestors who came to Wellington County to settle, such as the Women's Institute Tweedsmuir Histories, the Wellington County Historical Society Essay and Journal Collection, and the Wellington County Local History Articles. These records are at

They also have a monthly newsletter, and every issue for 2014 is on the website at

Right now, until May 10, 2015, they have an exhibit called No One Goes 2 Palmerston ON: The Collection of Chad Martin, which, at one time, was a bustling town in Wellington County. The link is

Their website is at


Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Friday, January 16, 2015

Nova Scotia Schoolhouse Receives Heritage Designation

At November's town council meeting, a small one-room schoolhouse in Truro, Nova Scotia, received heritage designation. Originally located in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, it is now on the Nova Scotia Community College's property on Arthur Street in Truro.

The Little White Schoolhouse Museum's website has a picture of the schoolhouse, and lots of material in their archives, such as texts “used in Nova Scotia schools and other books relating to education from the mid-1800s to the early 1970s. In addition, annual Reports of the Superintendent of Education from 1851 onwards, the Journal of Education and other publications from 1893 onwards”.

They can also assist you to research student records of the Provincial Normal School, and the Provincial Normal College from 1854 to 1946.

My great-aunt Josephine Barclay, from Jordan River, Shelburne County, went to the Provincial Normal College in 1908, and then went to Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont, where she taught school. She was married to the Rev. George Gellatly.

Check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Trent Valley Archives

“Without archives, there is no history” is the tagline used by the Trent Valley Archives located in Peterborough, Ontario. I like this tagline, because it defines archives in one easy sentence. 

This archives is very active in its programming, has a great site, and a local history library. 

The research library has books on emigration, and ‘everyday life’. If you’re looking to learn about the history, people, sources and events that are linked to the area, this is a great place to start.

The website says that “This group offers many fascinating tours throughout the year, mostly in the summer and fall. From ghost walks, to pub crawls, to tours that focus on specific people or neighbourhoods, their tours are sure to delight any history or culture buff. You can stop by the Peterborough & the Kawarthas Visitor Centre to pick up a list of their upcoming events or go to their website to see which tours are available.”

In September, they had an open house, where they displayed, for example,  their holding of the First World War.

To read about the open house, you can go to

And next weekend, on October the 18th, they will present the Little Lake Twilight Cemetery Tour and Pageant, and the tours and pageant will begin at 6:00 pm. Reservation are required.

And on November the 6th, they will celebrate their 25th year anniversary. They will have a special dinner that night.

So it is clear that they are a very dynamic, engaged archives in the city of Peterborough, and if you have ancestors who are from there, this is one place that you should check for background information.

Their website is at

Their Facebook page is at

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Tour of Nova Scotia Archives and Its Holdings

On Wednesday, September 24, 2014 the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia is inviting everyone to a Tour of Nova Scotia Archives and Its Holdings from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm. The Nova Scotia Archives, Akins Room (wheelchair accessible) is located at 6016 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia

The guest speaker will be Garry Shutlak, Senior Archivist, Public Archives of Nova Scotia

Garry will talk about the website and the genealogical resources found there followed by a tour of the 3rd Floor holdings.

Open to the general public. All are welcome.

Friday, September 12, 2014

Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre - Ontario Jewish Archives-

Back in 1973, the Ontario Jewish Archives, known as the Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, started to acquire, preserve and today, it is making available documentary sources related to Ontario's Jewish community. 

Now, the Government of Canada has announced that it will be providing $195,100 through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund to support a renovation project undertaken by the Ontario Jewish Archives Foundation. With this funding the Foundation will retrofit the vault and redesign and furnish the public access space and document processing area in the Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre. 

The Ontario Jewish Archives is the largest professionally maintained repository of Jewish archival material in Canada.

You can search their archives where they have over 5,000 cubic feet of textual records, photos, newspapers, films, and oral histories. 

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Will Héritage index their records? Maybe.

Ever since Héritage, a division of Canadiana, put on all of those records from the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) over a year ago, I was asking “Where are the indexes that go with the digitization of these records?”

Héritage has the objective of digitizing 40,000 reels of microfilm from “Canada’s most important archival collections”. 

They hope to comprise 60 million page images when the project is completed next year. 

But not one of these records has been indexed! Not one! So what good are they to me? -

They say that they “would like to enhance access to this content by partially transcribing select collections. Once transcribed, researchers can conduct key-word searches on a collection, allowing them to find specific personal names, geographical locations, events, etc. within a document. We need your help in choosing which collections to transcribe first”. 

So, they have put together a short survey to ask our opinion. I clicked every one of the records that they have included in the survey. 

They say that “By participating in this short survey, you can have a voice in telling Canadiana which collections are important to you. If interested, please share this widely with your members, branches, and other contacts to help us get the most feedback”. 

Please take a minute to go through the records, and click the ones you would like to see indexed.

The website for Canadiana is

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Archives is asking for your help

The Flamborough Heritage Society & Archives, is one of the largest and most active, local heritage groups and archives in Ontario. It is located in the former Wentworth County which was in the city of Hamilton in southwestern Ontario.  

And they are working on three projects -

  • The first project is a planned book on the history behind the names of communities that exist, or did exist at one time, in Flamborough
  • The second project is a compilation of the businesses in Flamborough, with an emphasis on Waterdown, from around 1850 onwards 
  • The third project is an inventory of street names in Waterdown, and the history behind the name

They would like to receive any material which would help with this research - photos, stories, advertisements or flyers etc. They can scan the original photos, or you can send in scanned photos, or documents to, or you can phone them for details at 905. 540.5161.

The website is at

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Annual Accrual of Historical Vital Statistics Now Available

My father (Harold Arthur Barclay) and myself (Elizabeth Anne Barclay) in the Public Gardens in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It was a favorite place to go on Sunday afternoons. 

I have been reminded by one of my readers that the Nova Scotia Archives has put on an additional 25,589 historical vital statistics on

These records were released on 31 December 2013 and since then have been digitized, fully indexed, and checked for quality control. This year's accruals include 14,974 births (1913), 4,233 marriages (1938), and 6,382 deaths (1963). As usual, the birth records include some 'delayed' entries for individuals born in 1913 (or earlier) but not registered until a later date.

My surnames of interest are -

BARCLAY - Shelburne County and Yarmouth County  

BLADES - Shelburne County and Yarmouth County 

WEBSTER - Kings County

Thursday, April 3, 2014

LAC to outsource national catalogue

From an article in the Ottawa Citizen by Don Butler comes the news that the Library and Archives Canada is going to outsource its library catalogue called AMICUS to an American company – Computer Library Centre Inc. (OCLC). This also involves 1,300 other libraries across Canada. 

So what do you think? Is this a good or bad move for the LAC? Does it change your opinion of the future of the LAC, or are you not surprised by this move?

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Burleigh Papers Online

Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario and its archives has just announced the public launch of their latest digital initiative - the digitization of the Dr. Herbert Clarence Burleigh fonds.

I took time and checked certain family names, and found quite a bit of information - especially Loyalists families of the area. For example, it just doesn’t pertain to people in Kingston, there was information on the townships of the Bay of Quinte area too.

They say that “Through the Burleigh Family, and in particular, Peter and Evelyn Burleigh, whose generous donation has made this exciting initiative a reality, and in collaboration with the Internet Archives of Toronto the research amassed by Dr. Burleigh on approximately 1,000 families, who have roots in the Kingston region, is now available on-line”.

You can go to the website at

Monday, March 25, 2013

The United Church of Canada’s Toronto Archives Is Moving

This is a press release that was released on their website on March 6, 2013, and may be of interest to my readers -

Toronto: The United Church of Canada announced today that its Toronto-based archives will be moving this summer from its current location at the United Church’s national office in west-end Toronto to the Toronto Christian Resource Centre in the Regent Park neighbourhood of downtown Toronto.

In announcing the decision on the new location for the archives, Nora Sanders, General Secretary of the General Council, said, “I am pleased that this move will mean not only that we will be saving a considerable amount of money but also that as a tenant we will be financially supporting a local United Church ministry.”

Sanders says that in addition to being able to house the United Church’s archival collection now located at the General Council Office at 3250 Bloor Street West in Toronto, the new location at 40 Oak Street offers more than enough space to accommodate records that are currently stored off-site at an archival facility.

She explains the decision to move the archives ahead of the anticipated relocation of the General Council Office to Bloor Street United Church in 2018 was an opportunity that made financial sense for all parties to the five-year lease agreement.

The United Church of Canada supports a network of archives situated in eight different locations throughout Canada. The archives in Toronto manages the records of the General Council and the Central Ontario Conference records of Bay of Quinte, London, Hamilton, Manitou, and Toronto Conferences and their respective presbyteries and pastoral charges. The church’s archives outside of Ontario are not affected by the move.

The United Church’s Toronto archives moved to its current location in 2008, after more than 50 years on the campus of the University of Toronto’s Victoria University. No decision has been made about whether the Archives will move again when the General Council Office relocates to Bloor Street United Church.

Nichole Vonk, General Council Archivist, will oversee the monumental task of moving close to 20,000 boxes of records to the new site. The church will be contracting specialized movers, the new location will meet the institutional standards set by the Canadian Council of Archives, and all the records will continue to be administered by professional staff.

Although not located directly on a subway line, the Archives’ new location at 40 Oak Street is easily accessible by public transit, will have on-site parking, and is closer to the United Church’s theological school at the University of Toronto.

While planning and preparations are underway to move the collection from its current location,

•the Archives will remain open during regular public hours until June 6, 2013.

•the Archives will not receive any records deposits after April 30, 2013. Records can be donated to the Archives when it reopens in September 2013.

•the Archives will be closed to all researchers June 10–September 15, 2013, reopening in the new location September 16, 2013.

•the Archives will continue to provide reference service for certificates or legal requests while it is closed to the public.

Vonk emphasizes that, throughout the transition, the church remains committed to providing continued uninterrupted, open access to its archival records related to residential schools for the purposes of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

For up-to-date information about The United Church of Canada’s archival programs and on the move, see the Archives webpage. Questions and concerns about the move should be directed to Nichole Vonk, General Council Archivist.

The archival website is at

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Digging for Gold in Toronto’s Libraries and Archives

On Saturday the 4 May 2013 from 10:00 am to 4:30 pm, there will be a  Workshop given by various members of the Toronto Branch OGS at the North York Memorial Community Hall, 5110 Yonge St., Toronto entitled Digging for Gold in Toronto’s Libraries and Archives.

It will be a one-day workshop with sessions for all skill levels – full of great reasons to visit Toronto's wonderful cluster of archives and libraries in person.

For more information, contact info is available at

For more information on libraries and archives, you can go to

Toronto Public Library

Archives of Ontario (located in Toronto)

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Heritage Property Resource at the Nova Scotia Archives

People who want to join the Canada-wide celebration of Heritage Day can explore a new heritage property resource at the Nova Scotia Archives.

For the first time, records and photos of pre-1914 built homes, churches, railway stations, bridges and other community structures are available.

A selection of the records is now available for visitors on public computers in the archives' reading room. The records include photos, descriptions of the properties and information about historical features and architecture.

The Provincial Built Heritage Inventory Project began in the late 1990s to record and document all buildings built before 1914. The Heritage Property Program records were digitized then transferred to the Archives in January.

Information about the archives' resources and programs is available at

I checked the information that the archives has on the town of Shelburne and there is the paper-covered book containing list of assessments of Shelburne county and poor taxes for 1787, in semi-alphabetical order. I had never actually seen the book before, only a photocopy of it, so it was good to see the book itself as it was created in 1787.

The other communities that I have got to check when I have more time is Barrington, Tusket, Yarmorth, and Kentville.

Two other papers I noticed was the original signature of Andrew Barclay, and a postcard photo of James Barclay’s house, son of Andrew, in Shelburne, on page 9 image 4.

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Westmount Historical Association

The Westmount Historical Association of Montreal has set a plaque in the GLEN to explain the centuries of use by humans.

In the 1800s, Scottish immigrants who built large homes on the sunny slopes of Westmount walked beside the streams to reach the church and the railway station in St. Henri. In the early 1700s, the French farming families who were deeded land along Côte St. Antoine Road transported their farm produce to market in Ville-Marie through the GLEN.

Before that, the Native People of the area walked to the petite St. Pierre River.

You are urged to bring your children and your visitors to Montreal to view this important transportation link running between Westmount and St. Henri as it takes you under the magnificent CPR Railway Arch.

To read more about the Westmount Historical Association, go to

They have extensive archives located at the Westmount Public Library, and they have 1800 photographs, along with smaller collections of ephemera, pamphlets and personal papers. They also have extensive subject files relating to the history of Westmount.

© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Haldimand County Branch OGS Meeting

On March 5, 2013 at 1:30 p. m. there will be a meeting of the Haldimand County Branch OGS at the Haldimand County Museum & Archives, 8 Echo Street, Cayuga, Ontario.

The title of the talk will be "Open House Dead Ends", and the speakers will be members of the branch who will help in any way for those looking up information both from the branch library & museum archives.

Please bring any information that you would like help with in tracing family members in Haldimand County. Sometimes we had dead ends, brick walls & find we are at a lost of how to continue doing research for these people & places.

Go to to get more information