Showing posts with label census. Show all posts
Showing posts with label census. Show all posts

Friday, January 24, 2014

Nova Scotia Census, Assessment and Poll Tax Records, 1770-1795, 1827

Ancestry.ca has taken the records from Nova Scotia Archives and under agreement with the archives, have put them online. 

The Non-Census Records in the Collection Nova Scotia Poll Tax Rolls, 1791–1793.
The index includes the name and location for each person. Records in this collection are from the following counties -

· Annapolis

· Antigonish

· Colchester

· Cumberland

· Guysborough

· Halifax

· Hants

· Kings

· Lunenburg

· Pictou

· Queens

· Shelburne

Tax Records

The tax records are from the Gideon White Family Papers. Gideon White was a loyalist from Massachusetts who moved to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, after the American Revolution. He served as tax collector for a time, and tax records for the years 1786–1787 are included in the collection.

The tax records provide names and addresses of Shelburne taxpayers, occupations, and county and poor taxes owed.

They can be accessed at http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=8809

You can also go to the Nova Scotia Archives at http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/census/ and read the individual narrative about each record, and go in-depth into the tax and census records for each of the areas noted above.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Only 6 days left until …



Guess what? It is 6 days away from being debuted on Ancestry.ca, and it is the  every name index to the 1921 Canada census!

Ancestry.ca will hold an official launch party in Toronto on the 29th. Glen Wright, Dr. Kevin James, and Mark McGowan will be there to give brief comments about the census.  


So keep the 29th open as it will be the day that the every name index to the 1921 Canada census will become available to the world!  

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Nova Scotia 1921 census is being transcribed

More 1921 census records have been added to Dwayne Meisner’s Nova Scotia site.

Some of them are -  

Bill Bruhm has transcribed the 1921 census for several areas in Lunenburg
County.

The areas are Northfield, which also includes West Northfield,
Cookville, Lower and Upper Northwest, Pine Hurst. He has also transcribed
the Chester Asylum, County Asylum, and the Indian Reserves.

In Halifax County, the following areas have been transcribed –

Lawrencetown, County Jail, City Prison, Sable Island Portuguese Cove in Halifax County, Ketch Harbour, Chebucto Head, Duncan Cove, Bedford Basin, Rockingham, Mount Saint Vincent, Hammond's Plains, as well as a few names from Fairview.

Tom Downing has transcribed the census for Seal Harbour in Guysborough
County. The census also includes Drum Head, Coddles Harbour

Alan Dinn has transcribed the 1921 census for Clementsport in Annapolis
County

Wendy Morash has transcribed the 1921 census for Peggy's Cove in Halifax
County. The census also includes Hackett's Cove, Glen Margaret and Indian
Harbour.

There are other areas that have been transcribed, and he adds to the site daily, so check it often.



Are there other areas in Canada being transcribed? 

Contact me at genealogycanada@aol.com, so that I can post them. Thank you. 

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Ancestry.ca Clarifies Access to 1921 Canada Census

Jeri Brown, Senior Consultant with Ancestry.ca, has written to me to make sure that everyone understands that -

Under the terms of the partnership with Library and Archives Canada, Canadians will be able to access the 1921 Census of Canada images free of charge through the Ancestry.ca website. If you currently do not have an account or registered login with Ancestry.ca, you will be prompted to register (for free) to access the images. Registration requires the entry of a name and email address only. As the images are free for Canadians only, those attempting to access the 1921 Census via the other sites (ie: Ancestry.com, Ancestry.co.uk, etc…), will be prompted to sign up for a 14-day free trial”.

Meanwhile, how is everyone finding the census? Is it easy to work with? Any problems?  

I have heard from some people that the census itself is rather “marked up” and some writing is difficult to read, and that the names are difficult to decipher.  

Other people have said that they have had no problems, everything has gone as planned, and that they found the people they were looking for, without delay.

Remember, the "every name index" will be available in 2 -3 months on Ancestry.ca

Friday, July 26, 2013

UPDATE: New version of the Census of 1851 (1852) database

The Library and Archives Canada has updated the 1851 (1852) census.
  
The 1851 Census marked the second collection of statistics for the Province of Canada (consisting of Canada West and Canada East). Information was also collected for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

In addition to searching by geographical information such as province, district, and sub-district, users can now also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age of an individual.

In Canada East and Canada West, the census was supposed to have been taken in 1851, but was actually take in January 1852. 

So, in the Canada East and Canada West, it will be the age of the person's next birthday in 1852, not in 1851 (Column 6).

Also, in Canada East and Canada West, there was an urban and a rural census, and they asked different questions. 

In Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, the census was taken between June and December 1851.


If you are having difficulty finding the person you are looking for in the 1851-1852 census, not all schedules survived.  

Go to   

Friday, July 19, 2013

Censuses of Canada West and Canada East, 1842

In this notice received yesterday, here are the 1842 Canadian Census for Canada West and Canada West -

“Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce that Canadians can now access the Census of Canada West, 1842 as well as the Census of Canada East, 1842 online. In 1841, Upper Canada was renamed Canada West, whereas Lower Canada became Canada East. These two jurisdictions are now known as the provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

Each census is partly nominal and contains the names of heads of family, their occupation and the number of residents for each family.

For the Canada West (Ontario) Census, go to

Thursday, June 13, 2013

UPDATE: Census of Lower Canada (Quebec), 1825 now available online at LAC

Just received this notice from the LAC - 

"Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce that Canadians can now access the Census of Lower Canada, 1825 online. The Census of Lower Canada, 1825 is partly nominal and therefore only contains the names of heads of family, their occupation, and the number of residents for each family.

Users can search this new database by the names of heads of family, as well as by geographical information such as district and sub-district names".

They are available in JPG, and PDF, and there are 74,322 records.

The surname, given name(s), occupation, number of residents (classed by age – not name or relationship to head of the household), district name, sub-district name, volume number, page number, microfilm, and reference are listed in the census.

To suggest a correction, click on the Suggest a Correction link to access an electronic form


Tuesday, February 26, 2013

UPDATE: LAC Release of a New Version of the Census of Canada, 1911 Database


This bit of positive news came from the LAC today -

Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the release of a new version of the Census of Canada, 1911 database. This fifth general census covered the nine provinces and two territories that were then part of Confederation: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

Previously, users could search only by geographical information, such as province, district and sub-district. Now, they can also search by nominal information, such as the name, given name(s) and age of an individual.

I decided to look for my maternal grandfather Lester Blades in East Pubnico, Nova Scotia and he was there when I looked at the jpg of the census report. It was very easy to do. I just put his name in the search box, as well as the province of Nova Scotia. You should give this a try. You can either view it as a jpg or pdf – and it is FREE!

It is at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/1911.aspx

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Canadian Blogger Supports Canada Census 1921 Indexing Project

M. Diane Rogers of the blog CanadaGenealogy, or, Jane's Your Aunt! has had an idea.

Why not a series of blog prompts on the 15th of each month?

She will be “blogging either about someone who lived in a certain Canadian province or territory, or about new or interesting resources for genealogy in a particular area of Canada, or about a special Canadian topic, like the long awaited release of the 1921 Canadian census in June.

I hope to be supporting indexing of this at a Canadian site like AutomatedGenealogy.com right after Library and Archives Canada receives it”.

While she awaits for the census to be released, she has put on the blogging calendar the dates of March 11th, and the territory of the Yukon, and the second one will be the week of April 8th and the province of Alberta.

Go to the blog, click on to http://canadagenealogy.blogspot.ca/2013/02/canadian-genealogy-blogging-prompts-for.html

Saturday, February 9, 2013

UPDATE: 1921 Canada Census


We are starting to get release information on the 1921 Canada Census bit by bit.

Apparently, it is going to be released by Statistics Canada to the Library and Archives Canada on June 2, 2013, and then to us sometime after that date.

‘Sometime after that’ could mean months, not days, after the LAC receives it, but it will be in the system June 2, 2013.

The population of the country was 8,788,483 in 1921, and the census was taken on 1 June .

The Library and Archives Canada plan to digitize the microfilmed population schedules and make them available online with a nominal index as soon as it is possible.

Stay tuned!

Thursday, August 9, 2012

OGS Blog Poll #2

The first poll of the OGS blog has taken place, and now it’s time for Poll # 2.

The subject of this poll is Records. You can choose as many choices from the list as you wish. To view the results after you have voted, simply refresh the page.

Aside from Census, Birth, Death and Marriage records, what other records have you found useful in building your family tree?

So far, the poll has shown that Cemetery Records as the first choice, Church and Parish Records in second place, and Wills and Probate in the third place.

Go to www.ogs.on.ca/ogsblog, and put in your choice!

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Genealogical Day in England and Wales (Seminar)

Gary Schroder, QFHS President, will give a talk on Sa turday, March 31st 2012 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Quebec Family History Society Llibrary, 173 Cartier Avenue in Pointe-Claire.

The purpose of this seminar will be to A) examine the basic structures of family history research in England, Civil Registration of BMD's 1837-2005, Censuses 1841-1911, Wills 1858-2011, etc., and B) examine how to find your ancestors for the period prior to 1837 and how to make the best use of the English databases to found to be found on Ancestry and other commercial websites.

Reservations are necessary: call 514.695.1502, or you can visit the society online at http://www.qfhs.ca/. The fee $30.00.

Saturday, March 3, 2012

Scottish Ancestry Research Workshop

A press release was received from Christine Woodcock the other day, and it says -

"Christine Woodcock will be giving a talk at the Kitchener Public Library (Country Hills Branch) on Monday, March 19th at 6:30 pm.

Her talk will center around the Statutory Records, Old Parish Registers, The Scottish Naming Pattern, Irregular Marriages, Making Use of the Census Records, and other useful resources including online resources, local resources, and more.

Admission is free (being Scottish, this is always my favourite price!) but you are asked to call the library ahead of time to register (519-743-3558). This will also help us to ensure we have enough hand-outs for everyone.

You can also contact Christine at cdwoodcock56@sympatico.ca

Sunday, February 8, 2009

The Canadian Census of 1891

The 1891 Canadian Census is fully online now at the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1891/index-e.html.

The 1891 Census was taken in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories (which, at the time, covered modern-day Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northern Manitoba, Northern Ontario, Northern Quebec, Labrador, Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut).

The census was taken on April 5th, 1891, and very little change was made to the collection of the data from previous censuses. Information was gathered for 4,833,329 individuals in 1891.

Unfortunately, only Schedule I remains (a nominal list of the people in the country) - all of the other schedules (there were 8) were destroyed - and only Schedule I was microfilmed.

There are 25 columns, and you can read their definitions and explanations at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1891/001081-2000-e.html.

There are three things which struck me about this census, and I think they are really good - it's free; you get to view the complete image of Schedule I; and you can add a comment, if you wish.

Congratulations and "Thank yous" go out to the LAC and to Ancestry.ca for this much-anticipated release.

Sunday, August 17, 2008

Canada Genealogy Centre is 5 Years Old!

It's hard to believe, but the Canada Genealogy Centre (GCG) is already five years old!

It was on March 29, 2003——a cold windy Saturday——that I bundled up and went out to Nepean (now Ottawa) to see the launch of a new genealogy site at the Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

The first site was 93 pages long, and by June 5, 2004, the number of pages had increased to over 300 pages.

Today, there are 20 databases online, the two newest being the Chinese Immigration List and the 1881 Census.

In fact, it is so popular that it is the second-leading website among the federal government sites - a close second to the weather website!

The top four databases, in terms of hits, are Immigration (1925-1935), Western Land Grants, the Soldiers of the First World War, and the 1871 Census.

They also have online "That's My Family", developed in partnership with the Bibliotheque et Archives nationales du Quebec and Ancester Search.

According to John Reid's blog, the hardcopy of the 1916 Census for the Western Provinces has just arrived at the LAC, and is now in the CGC Microfilm Consultation Room. The index of the census is being done by Ancestry.com.

These days, 60 percent of visits to the LAC are to the CGC.