Showing posts with label genealogy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label genealogy. Show all posts

Thursday, October 30, 2014

New post about the Archives of Ontario (AO)


Have you ever read Jane MacNamara’s blog Where the story takes me:Tales of family and local history research and folk I meet along the way?

If it isn’t on your reading list, maybe it should be, because she always has subjects that are interesting to genealogists.

Her latest post is worth reading if you have Ontario ancestors – because it is a post about the Archives of Ontario (AO).

In the post, she explains what the AO holds, and what you can find within the different archival material – and there is tons of material for you to research.

Let me say that the AO does live up to Jane’s review. I found it very centrally located to where I was staying, had good access for parking, excellent facility to eat your lunch or to just take a break away from researching. There is a very good a shopping centre which is a short distance from the archives.

There is one thing that I would add, and that is, be sure to read the information first onsite at the archives website before going there. Become familiar with the holdings, and it will be so helpful when you start researching. I printed the material off before I went there, and had it in a folder for easy reference. And if it is the first time that you will be there, be sure to register to your pass online, and then pick it up at the front desk once you get there.

Jane’s blog is at http://wherethestorytakesme.ca/

The website for the Archives of Ontario is Tracing your ancestry at the Archives of Ontario at http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/tracing/index.aspx

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Joint presentation this Sunday in Ottawa


 
UK Rockstar Genealogist Kirsty Gray will give two lectures in Ottawa on Sunday November 2nd from 2 – 4 pm at the Woodroffe United Church, Banquet Hall, 207 Woodroffe Ave.

The two lecture will be -

1. Searching for Names: Challenges, Pitfalls and the Downright Ridiculous

2. Solving Problems Through Family Reconstruction

Admission is $10 per person at the door. A break with light refreshments will be held between the two lectures.

The Ottawa Genealogical Society (OGS) is at http://ogsottawa.on.ca/

British Isles Family History Society of Greater
Ottawa (BIFHSGO)is at http://www.bifhsgo.ca/

The Facebook page is at https://www.facebook.com/pages/British-Isles-Family-History-Society-of-Greater-Ottawa/149788348437126

The lectures will be sponsored by the Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society and the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO).

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

GANS to host meeting tonight


There will be a meeting of the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia tonight at the Akins A/V Room, Nova Scotia Archives, 6016 University Avenue, Halifax, NS at 7:30 when Irene Schofield, GANS Programme Convener, will talk about the Canadian Census and The 1940 National Registration

She will show us samples of the information that can be found for your ancestors.

Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments will be served. Hope to see you there!

The website is at http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca 

Family History Library Announces Free Classes




We received this email this morning –

The Family History Library Announces Free Classes for November 2014

Nov. 1 Recursos en linea adema̍s de FamilySearch is a class for Spanish-speaking guests and starts at 1:00 p.m. 

Nov. 5-26 Russian Print and Handwriting Series. There are 4 parts to this series of classes, taught every Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. 

Nov. 8 Norway Research Series. The classes include “How to Use Church Records in Norway,” “How to Search Death Notices in Norway,” and “Exploring Probate Records in Norway.” These classes run from 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. 

Nov. 8 American Indian Series. Classes include: “American Indian Research and the FamilySearch Wiki,” and “American Indian Case Study.” Classes are held at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. 

Nov. 15 Boy Scout Genealogy Merit Badge Workshop. This workshop begins at 10:00 a.m. Register for this 90-minute class at least one week prior to the workshop to find out which requirements should be completed before attending. Email FHLClassReg@familysearch.org 

Nov. 15 ¿Mis antepasados vinieron de . . . ? This class is for Spanish-speaking guests and starts at 1:00 p.m. 

Nov. 15 Reading Spanish Handwriting will be taught at 3:00 p.m. 

*Registration is required for classes with an asterisk. 

Register by 9:00 p.m. the Thursday before the class date by sending an email to FHLClassReg@familysearch.org or calling 1-801-240-4950.

Go to https://familysearch.org/locations/saltlakecity-library for additional information. 

Their Facebook page is at https://www.facebook.com/familysearch

Monday, October 27, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 27 October 2014


I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media websites, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada (October 20 – October 27, 2014) 


Did you know that in 1864, a group of Confederate soldiers based in Canada attacked the town of St. Alban's, Vermont? The soldiers robbed a bank of $200,000 and killed one man in their escape. The incident strained Canadian-American relations already weakened by the events of the American Civil War.

You can read about the robbery at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_in_the_American_Civil_War
=============================================
In 1818, Canada and the U.S. signed the Convention of London. The treaty established the 49th Parallel as the boundary from Rainy River, Ontario to the Rockies.

To read further on the subject, you can go to http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3406400208.html
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What an interesting history Canada has had in its moving from Niagara to Quebec to Toronto and finally to Ottawa in search of a place to seat the Canadian government. In 1855, it was moved to Toronto from Quebec City.

To read more, please go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legislative_Assembly_of_the_Province_of_Canada
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In 1876, the first shipment of wheat from Western Canada to Ontario left Winnipeg, and this blog posted the story of Peel's Prairie Province releasing Grain Elevators in Canada books online.

To read more about the grain elevators, go to http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/10/peels-prairie-province-releases-grain.html
=============================================
In 1926, magician Harry Houdini—appearing at the Princess Theatre in Montreal—received a fatal blow to the stomach. When a McGill University student asked him if he could shrug off blows to the body; Houdini said “Yes”, but before he could brace himself, the blow was dealt. He died of a ruptured appendix 10 days later in Detroit.

To read more about this story, go to http://www.snopes.com/horrors/freakish/houdini.asp

Social Media


(Video) Iconic Saskatoon hotel general manager set to retire
http://globalnews.ca/news/1630167/iconic-saskatoon-hotel-general-manager-set-to-retire
The Delta Bessborough is an iconic building in Saskatoon, and its general manger, Andrew Turnbull, will retire at the end of the month.
=============================================
(Video) The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/10/23/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
Read about Lt. Col. Leonard's observations during the week of March 20th.
=============================================
French In Name Only
This new blog explores the family history of the surname of French/ffrench and the surname of Grace. It also demonstrates, through family stories, the close connections between Canada and the United States.

Nova Scotia

Demolition crews dig up piece of naval history in Halifax
http://metronews.ca/news/halifax/1188486/anchor-a-wow-demolition-crews-dig-up-piece-of-naval-history-in-halifax-2/
The discovery of an anchor in Halifax’s dockyards believed to have belonged to Canada’s first naval warship. The director of the Naval Museum of Halifax said he’s “85 to 90 per cent certain” it belonged to HMCS Niobe, the first Canadian warship to enter the country’s territorial waters, on Oct. 21, 1910.

RBC Black History Month Student Essay Competition continues to grow in its sixth year
http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1430406/rbc-black-history-month-student-essay-competition-continues-to-grow-in-its-sixth-year/
Students can now earn one of 20 scholarships, up from three, including grand prizes of up to $5,000 that will help make their someday a reality. The competition gives students an opportunity to learn about the contribution black people have made to Canadian history.

Windsor’s Hockey Heritage Museum shoots for expanded hours
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1244887-windsor-s-hockey-heritage-museum-shoots-for-expanded-hours
The museum season now runs from June 15 to October 05, but during the pumpkin regatta, held Thanksgiving weekend, the tourist bureau in Windsor gets hundreds of inquiries about the hockey museum.

Maritime voyage: Halifax to Prince Edward Island
http://www.jpost.com/Not-Just-News/Maritime-voyage-Halifax-to-Prince-Edward-Island-379142
Read a Jerusalem Post writer’s travels from Nova Scotia to Prince Edward Island.

Ontario

Genealogical journey yields results
http://www.orilliapacket.com/2014/10/17/genealogical-journey-yields-results
For Orillia resident Phil Jenkinson, his work following his genealogy led to the realization one of his relatives played a role in the First World War.

Union Gas donation will help with historic chapel restoration
http://www.napaneeguide.com/2014/10/23/union-gas-donation-will-help-with-historic-chapel-restoration
Union Gas presented a cheque for $20,000 to the committee that is fundraising to restore Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of The Mohawks, located on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory.

Royal Canadian Air Force squadron returns to RAF Leeming to take part in exercise for first time since it was based there in WWII
A Royal Canadian Air Force squadron has returned to RAF Leeming more than 70 years after using it as a base during World War Two.

Manitoba

Park to celebrate Upper Fort Garry: A Significant part of Manitoba's history
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/park-to-celebrate-upper-fort-garry-279699702.html
Friends of Upper Fort Garry unveiled the first of a three-phase development that will celebrate the fort's singular significance in the province's history.

Alberta

Local honoured by Alberta Historical Resources Foundation
http://www.camrosecanadian.com/2014/10/23/local-honoured-by-alberta-historical-resources-foundation
The outstanding efforts of Alberta’s “heritage heroes” and the work of local organizations to preserve the province’s rich history were recognized October 16 with the announcement of the 2014 Alberta Historical Resources Foundation Heritage Awards.

Story of the Week



Canadian Library Month 

In October, the inspiration created in and by libraries is celebrated during Canadian Library Month with the theme “Libraries Inspire!”.

Did you know that “over 21-million Canadians hold a public library card, making public libraries the most popular cultural institution in the country? Over 97 percent of Canadians live in communities served by a public library, and the library adds to the vitality of every one of these communities.”

And don’t forget genealogical libraries!

In Ottawa, we are fortunate to have many genealogical libraries in the city, and we should take advantage of them.

They hold maps, directories, books, and those ever so important family files that may hold clues to our ancestors, census, and cemetery records.

For more information Library Month, go to http://librarymonth.ca/

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in country! 

The next post will be on 03 November 2014.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Canada's First History Youth Forum in Ottawa


Twenty-two students from communities all across Canada have earned themselves a trip to Ottawa later this month during the first Canada's History Youth Forum.

The students were selected following their regional heritage fairs, and tasked with making a short video that demonstrated the historical significance of their topic. 

The videos were all posted online and a public vote encouraged Canadians to watch and support their favourite student flicks. After a combined total of over 34,000 votes, a panel of judges selected twenty-two winners for this year's program. 

The recipients of the 2014 Young Citizens program are: 

Abby Peterson, Rocky Mountain House, AB — Canada & Titanic
Dominic Shoop, Okotoks, AB —The Flintlock Pistol
Dylan Lee, Vancouver, BC — The Chinese Head Tax
Alexandra Mines, Vancouver, BC — Les Réfugiés Indésirables du Canada
Jenna Allison, Winnipeg, MB — Nellie McClung
Rachel Teller, Winnipeg, MB — Sir Frederick Banting
Maude Couturier, Fredericton, NB — Les infirmières militaires canadiennes
Emma Morehouse, Lincoln, NB — Patrick Owens Covered Bridge
Jasmine Rahman, St. John's, NL—The Newfoundland Conscience: A History of Giving
Jack Goldsworthy, Torbay, NL —Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: The Original Way of Life
Ben Strickland, Bridgewater, NS —The Mosquito
Sam Rogers, Lower Onslow, NS — The Black Devil's Brigade
Eastyn Klages, Chatsworth, ON — A Little Taste of Home
Paris Snake, Rama, ON — Residential Schools: The Intergenerational Impacts
Karla McCallum, Charlottetown, PEI —The Journey of the Potato
Harrison Duffy, Kinkora, PEI — History Of the PEI Railway
Élodie Chamberland, Sainte-Hélène-de-Kamouraska, QC — La Seconde Guerre mondiale
Andréanne Girard-Lemieux, Saint-Gédéon-de-Beauce, QC — Reproduction de mocassins amérindiens
Dylan Donald, Regina, SK — Chuckwagon Racing
Ella Forrest, Regina, SK — My Oma's Story
Duncan Snooks, Whitehorse, YT— Jacques Cartier
Maximilian Wanner, Whitehorse, YT — North West Mounted Police 

Honourable mentions include: 

Cauren Bale. De Winton, AB — The Evolution Of Canadian Figure Skating
Amina GuoVancouver, BC — Japanese Canadian internment
Olivia Richards. Vancouver, BC — 1961 train smoke eaters
Siya Johal. Delta, BC — My Sikh Family History
Luke Harris. North Vancouver, BC — Vimy Ridge
Jacob Grant, Winnipeg, MB — Andrew Charles Mynarski
Luke Battcock, Paradise. NL — Gros Morne
Griffin Fancy, Bridgewater. NS — Prestigious Provo
Julia McNeaney. ON — Ridley College
Turner Clarke, Port Colborne. ON — The Wainfleet Bog
Clara Sismondo. Kingston, ON — KCVI : a history
Lise Charles, Charlottetown. PEI — Un pėcheur madelinot
Karine Champagne, Saint-Honoré-de-Shenley. QC — Le patrimoine des Jésuites en Nouvelle-France
Makayla Kaye. Whitehorse, YT — Yukon First nation 

To see more about the Young Citizens Program, visit their website at www.YoungCitizens.ca

Two virtual exhibits at the Toronto Public Library


The Toronto Public Library has two new digital exhibits, and the first one is called Frozen Ocean which is on until December 31, 2014, and the second exhibit is called Toronto: A Place of Meeting.

Frozen Oceans tells the story about the North-west Passage and how it became for many an obsession. Browse colourful maps, beautiful illustrations, posters and books in this online exhibit. And having viewed the exhibits myself, I can say that the maps and illustrations are simply beautiful, and compelling.

To view the exhibit, go to http://ve.torontopubliclibrary.ca/frozen_ocean/index.htm 

Toronto: A Place of Meeting will be of particular interest to people who have ancestors who lived in Toronto. It covers the history of the city in a timeline of five distinct eras, beginning with the first human presence in the city 8000 BC and ending in 2003.

To view the exhibit, go to http://ve.torontopubliclibrary.ca/TPM/index.html 

Friday, October 24, 2014

Peel's Prairie Province releases Grain Elevators in Canada books online


Peel's Prairie Provinces, in partnership with the University of Alberta Libraries, has put online the data on grain elevators in Canada collected by the Canadian Grain Commission. The data, beginning in 1912 and ending in 1998, is now freely available online. 

These records contain lists of licensed elevators, their locations and capacity in western and eastern Canada. 

Peel's Prairie Provinces website is dedicated to preserving western Canadian history and Canadian prairie culture. One can find historical newspapers, bibliography of books, directories, and pamphlets online.  

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Extreme Explorers – Sea to Space

The Canadian Museum of History has a special exhibit on Canada’s leading-edge science and exploration over the years called Extreme Explorers – Sea to Space.

An interesting part of the exhibit will the Arctic Medal 1818–1855. Authorized by Queen Victoria in 1857, it was awarded to individuals around the world who participated ― during the years 1818 to 1855 ― in discovery missions to find the North Pole or the Northwest Passage, or in search expeditions to locate Sir John Franklin’s missing ships.

This exhibit will be from the present to January 4, 2015, and you can read more about the exhibit at http://www.historymuseum.ca/event/extreme-explorers-sea-to-space/?cm_mid=4030473&cm_crmid=76c38def-186a-e211-9333-005056a35e1c&cm_medium=email 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Ancestry.ca offers FREE access


Ancestry.ca has released the results of a survey which shows a puzzling result – while 94% Canadians feels that knowing their family history is important, only 42% know where their grandparents were born. In light of this, Ancestry is offering free access to Canadian Passenger Lists until 11:59 October 23, 2014. 

That causes genealogist to think, doesn’t it? Maybe it is part of the answer as to why there isn’t a great ground swell for Family History Month that I wrote about in last week’s Canadian Week in Review (CWR). If you haven’t my editorial yet, you can go to http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/10/canadian-week-in-review-13-october-2014.html

Meanwhile, Ancestry.ca says - 

Canada may pride itself on being a nation built on immigration but according to a new survey from Ancestry, the world’s largest online family history resource, some of us know very little about our own family history – including where our ancestors originated from and when they first came to Canada. 

In a survey of 1,025 Canadians*, Ancestry discovered that 47 per cent don’t know when their ancestors first arrived in Canada. This is despite the fact that 94 per cent feel that knowing one’s family history is important. 

Additionally, the research revealed that 42 per cent of Canadians don’t know where their own grandparents were born. 

“Immigration is one of the foundations of Canada, so it is surprising how many Canadians don’t know where their ancestors came from, or when they first arrived in the country,” said Lesley Anderson, family historian for Ancestry. “There are so many wonderful historical records available for people to discover their ancestors’ immigration stories, such as Passenger Lists or border crossings, that give you clues as to why your ancestors may have left their homelands or how they came to Canada. The stories you can discover about your forebears are often fascinating and can help to inform your own sense of identity.” 

Ancestry is currently offering free access to its collection of global immigration records including the Canadian Passenger Lists, a collection of more than 7 million records detailing the people who came to Canada by ship between the years of 1865 and 1935, the key growth period in immigration to Canada. The free access lasts until 11:59 on October 23, 2014. 

* Conducted in June 2014

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Fall workshop in Toronto

Gwyneth Pearce, Secretary of the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society has sent us a reminder from the Branch that their fall workshop, "Industrial England", is coming up in less than two weeks - on Saturday 1 November.

This full-day workshop, co-sponsored with the Canadiana Department of North York Central Library, will explore the social, economic and cultural effects of the Industrial Revolutions on the lives of English people from 1750 to 1900. Author and professional genealogist Kirsty Gray will be our keynote speaker.

Spaces are still available, but we encourage you to sign up soon to ensure a spot. OGS members are eligible for a fee discount.

Full details about the program, speakers and how to register, are available on our Branch website at http://torontofamilyhistory.org/learn/workshops/industrial-england-workshop/.

Their Facebook page is on https://www.facebook.com/TOFamilyHistory

Monday, October 20, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 20 October 2014


I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media websites, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada (October 14 – October 20, 2014) 


In 1937, public schools in Toronto opened after a six-week delay caused by a polio epidemic which claimed 150 lives.

To read more about the polio epidemic, go to http://www.cpha.ca/en/programs/history/achievements/02-id/polio.aspx
=============================================
In 1923, Canada’s “Bluenose” defeated the “Columbia” in an international boat race.

To view a Heritage Minute video of the Bluenose, go to https://www.historicacanada.ca/content/heritage-minutes/bluenose
=============================================
In 1967, Expo 67, which opened in Montreal on April 27, closed with a final attendance total of more than 50 million.

To read about Expo ’67, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expo_67

Social Media


(Video) Maritime artist Canada's iconic Heritage Minutes into works of art
Christopher Hemsworth says he is such a big fan of the Heritage Minutes vignettes that his friend bought him the complete set of commercials on DVD.
=============================================
Researching Relatives - A Genealogy Blog about Searching for Ancestors
http://researching-relatives.blogspot.com

Joanne Cowden, a new blogger, has ancestors in various US states, Canada, France, and Germany, and now she is starting to share these ancestors with follow genealogists.

Nova Scotia

Memorial planned for Nova Scotia woman murdered in domestic violence case a century ago
More than 100 years ago, the name of Theresa (Balsor) McAuley Robinson was on the lips of many Kings County residents. Her husband, William S. Robinson, was judged guilty of her murder and sentenced to death. He was the last person publicly hung in Kings County.

Legacy of local Springhill Veterans preserved
http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1428894/legacy-of-local-springhill-veterans-preserved
Scott Armstrong, Member of Parliament for Cumberland–Colchester–Musquodoboit Valley, today announced Government of Canada funding for the restoration of the Springhill Soldiers' Monument, which honours the achievements and sacrifices of Veterans from within the community.

Libraries: Presenting history in a different way
http://www.ngnews.ca/Community/2014-10-13/article-3901804/Libraries%3A-Presenting-history-in-a-different-way/1
Discover history can be approached in a new ways at Nova Scotia libraries, such as storytelling and writing your own history.

Vandals can’t stop work on Black Loyalist Heritage Centre
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1243763-vandals-can-t-stop-work-on-black-loyalist-heritage-centre
What promises to be one of Nova Scotia’s star attractions in 2015 is nearing completion in Shelburne County, despite a setback caused by vandalism.
During the 1780s, Birchtown had the largest population of free blacks outside Africa, when some 3,500 arrived there after the American Revolution.

Hundreds attend Halifax powwow, celebrate Mi’kmaq History Month
Hundreds of aboriginal people and non-natives celebrated First Nations heritage and culture on Saturday at an indoor powwow in Halifax.

History: Hantsport was flourishing 98 years ago
When a New Brunswick-based magazine published a feature on the  Annapolis Valley in 1916, Hantsport was one of the towns profiled.

Prince Edward Island

Bonavista honoured with Prince of Wales prize
http://www.nlnewsnow.com/News/Local/2014-10-14/article-3902869/Bonavista-honoured-with-Prince-of-Wales-prize/1
Heritage Canada award recognizes town for preservation of building.

New Brunswick

Historic Edmundston church will soon be rebuilt
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/historic-edmundston-church-will-soon-be-rebuilt-pastor-says-1.2797817
Anglican St. John the Baptist Church was destroyed in a suspicious fire on September 20th.

Ontario

The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard 
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/10/16/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
Follow Lt. Col. Leonard during the weeks he travelled from battleground to battleground.

Quiz: Can you pass this Canadian citizenship test?
http://metronews.ca/news/ottawa/1184269/quiz-could-you-pass-a-canadian-citizenship-test
About 140 students from across the country were put to the Citizenship Challenge on Wednesday when they played a bingo-style game at the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa.

The Musées de la Civilisation de Québec to be honoured in Ottawa for their exhibition dedicated to Aboriginal peoples
http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1427006/the-musees-de-la-civilisation-de-quebec-to-be-honoured-in-ottawa-for-their-exhibition-dedicated-to-aboriginal-peoples
Inaugurated in November 2013, This Is Our Story: First Nations and Inuit in the 21st Century, is the latest addition to the Musées de la Civilisation de Québec's (MCQ) permanent exhibits. This ambitious project offers a contemporary vision of the cultural diversity and Aboriginal realities within Quebec.

Manitoba

Stuart Stuart Murray out as head of Canadian human rights museum
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/10/15/stuart_murray_out_as_head_of_canadian_human_rights_museum_1.html
tuart Murray, a former Manitoba Progressive Conservative leader who oversaw the construction of the museum in Winnipeg since 2009, is leaving on November 1st, and another chief executive officer is being sought, the board of trustees said Wednesday.

Alberta

The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/10/16/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
Follow Lt. Col. Leonard during the weeks he travelled from battleground to battleground.

City recognized for efforts in historic preservation
http://medicinehatnews.com/news/local-news/2014/10/16/city-recognized-for-efforts-in-historic-preservation
The City of Medicine Hat is gaining new recognition for a program to protect its history.

British Columbia

Touring BC's 'Hidden' History Shared by Chinese and Indigenous People
http://www.thetyee.ca/News/2014/10/13/Shared-Chinese-Indigenous-History
Every year for the last five years, Bill Chu has conducted treks along the Fraser Canyon, up to Lytton, Lillooet, and Mount Currie. His purpose: to educate Canadians about the "real" shared history of Indigenous and Chinese people in British Columbia.

Story of the Week

Credit: Library and Archives Canada / C-029399

The Great Depression 

Starting in 1929, the Great Depression swept over the world, and it affected Canada greatly because of our dependence on exporting natural goods to countries that no longer needed them since their own industrial capacity was reduced because of the Depression.

Between 1929 and 1939, the gross national product dropped 40% (compared to 37% in the US). Unemployment reached 27% at the depth of the Depression in 1933! Many businesses closed, as corporate profits of $398 million in 1929 turned into losses of $98 million, due to falling prices.

It was a terrible time for our country.

When I was a child, I can remembers stories that my family use to tell of how they coped with the Depression, and of how my father took “to the rails” as a young man looking for work on the farms in Ontario . He found work on the fruit farms in the Niagara region of Ontario.

One of the imitative which brought my father back to Nova Scotia was the paving of roads that I wrote about in the post Nova Scotia Paving Programme in 1934 the government undertook http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/08/nova-scotia-paving-programme.html, and eventually the breakout of the Second World War.

If you have the occasion to research a person who was trying to come to Canada during the Depression years from the United states, for instance, do not be surprised if you find they were denied entry, unless they could prove that they wouldn’t take jobs away from Canadians.

If you want to learn more about the Great Depression, read this article - http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/great-depression/

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in country! 

The next post will be on 27 October 2014.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

New Digitized Ontario Patent Plans

We now have more than 4,100 recently digitized patent plans on the Archives of Ontario’s Visual Database. 

The images are fully accessible and in high-resolution in a zoomable format that allows you to view fine details – and some of the details are very fine detail indeed! 

Most, but not all of the Patent Plans are available, although looking through them, I would say that most of them are available. You can check to see if the AO have an original plan at the Archives Descriptive Database. 

You can read more about the Patent Plans at http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/about/patent-plans.aspx, and it gives the list of township or town that are available to view. I was looking for Elzivir Township and I found it. It was a list of names, showing where they were located in the township at the time. 

Just another tool that you can use to find out exactly where your ancestor was located!

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Oxford County Branch is now on Facebook!

Another Ontario Genealogical Society Branch has joined Facebook and it’s the Oxford County Branch in Southwestern Ontario. 

And it’s looks like they are of to a rousing start! 

They have lots of events to attend, and on their website, there are lots of information, for instance, there are wills, directories, and there is an index to obituaries online. So check them out! 


Thursday, October 16, 2014

LAC Update: Digitized Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files are starting to go online

Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1983-28-826

We have just received this notice from Library and Archives Canada(LAC) that they are finally putting digitized Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files on their site.

Here is the notice -

"In January 2014, we announced a project to digitize 640,000 Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files as part of the First World War commemoration activities of the Government of Canada. The goal of this project is to provide free access to high-quality digital copies of all service files in PDF format, anytime and anywhere.

Close to 100 years old, these personnel files are quite brittle. Additionally, over the years, service files have been consulted many times, so they are extremely fragile. It was time to take concrete steps to ensure their preservation for future generations.

To achieve this goal, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) will have to close portions of this collection as they undergo preparation, conservation, and digitization. The entire process is complex because each file must be examined: staples, paper clips and glue must be removed, and in some cases, the files must be treated for mould. After this preparation is completed, digitization is next, starting with box No. 1 and going up. Once digitized, the service files will be stored in a permanent, safe environment. We estimate that 32,000,000 pages will be available online once digitization is finished.

We are happy to inform you that we have started posting the digitized files online. They are accessible via our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914–1918 data base. As of today, 76,330 files are available online. Regular uploads of about 5,000 files will take place every two weeks. All digitized files are searchable by name, regimental number and rank. We will inform you as more digitized files are added to the database.'

So the website is at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx 

Two “brick walls” meetings in Canada in November



Two genealogical societies at opposite ends of the county are going to tackle Brick Walls - the British Columbia Genealogical Society (BCGS)  in Vancouver and the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia (GANS) in Halifax in the month of November! 

The first meeting Brick Walls Seminar 2 – Sharing Strategies on Tough Genealogy Problems by the British Columbia Genealogical Society (BCGS) will be Saturday, November 1, 1:00 – 5:00 pm.  

The panel members - M. Diane Rogers, Brenda L. Smith, and Peter Whitlock will then meet with attendees who have submitted questions in advance for 1-on-1 fifteen minute consultations. While this is happening special guest speaker Eunice Robinson will give a talk on planning a trip to Salt Lake City.

A delicious light meal and refreshments will be provided. And there are great door prizes for lucky participants, including a year’s subscription to FindMyPast.com and a year’s membership in the BC Genealogical Society!

There will be an end-of-the-day wrap-up plus lots of opportunities to ask questions and share experiences!

The fee will be $20.00 (includes food), and an additional charge of $10 for 1-on-1 meeting with an Expert.

Contact the BCGS for details and tickets: bcgs@bcgs.ca or call Susan Snalam at 604 273 8209. Pay at a meeting in person or through PayPal. We will ask for your phone number and an e-mail address, if applicable. These will only be used in case we need to contact you about this Seminar.

The website is at http://www.bcgs.ca/

The Genealogical Association of Novaa Scotia (GANS) will hold the second brick wall meeting on Tuesday, November 25, and it will be the 5th Annual Brick Wall Busters (Monthly Meeting) from .7:00 pm to 9:00 pm. It will be held at the Nova Scotia Archives, Akins Room, 6016 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Ginny Clark, CG(C), Dr. Allan Marble, CG(C) and Doug Cochrane CG(C) will provide information found on submitted brick wall questions. The deadline for receiving questions will be midnight October 25th, 2014.

Please include all pertinent available information such as surname and given name, approximate dates, area of Nova Scotia, the piece of information you would like to find, sources you have already checked, and your contact information. You should a present a specific question in which you require an answer or are most interested. We must receive adequate information in order to properly assist you with your query otherwise it may not be accepted.

Eight queries will be selected to be addressed at our lecture on November 25, 2014: four from local members who will be attending the meeting and four from members outside of the Halifax Regional Municipality who are not able to attend the meeting.

At the event, the local members will read their queries for the benefit of other attendees. A member of the GANS Executive will read the queries from the members from “away”.

To get details of the meeting, go to http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca/

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Trent Valley Archives

“Without archives, there is no history” is the tagline used by the Trent Valley Archives located in Peterborough, Ontario. I like this tagline, because it defines archives in one easy sentence. 

This archives is very active in its programming, has a great site, and a local history library. 

The research library has books on emigration, and ‘everyday life’. If you’re looking to learn about the history, people, sources and events that are linked to the area, this is a great place to start.

The website says that “This group offers many fascinating tours throughout the year, mostly in the summer and fall. From ghost walks, to pub crawls, to tours that focus on specific people or neighbourhoods, their tours are sure to delight any history or culture buff. You can stop by the Peterborough & the Kawarthas Visitor Centre to pick up a list of their upcoming events or go to their website to see which tours are available.”

In September, they had an open house, where they displayed, for example,  their holding of the First World War.

To read about the open house, you can go to http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/2014/09/14/about-75-people-attend--trent-valley-archives-open-house

And next weekend, on October the 18th, they will present the Little Lake Twilight Cemetery Tour and Pageant, and the tours and pageant will begin at 6:00 pm. Reservation are required.

And on November the 6th, they will celebrate their 25th year anniversary. They will have a special dinner that night.

So it is clear that they are a very dynamic, engaged archives in the city of Peterborough, and if you have ancestors who are from there, this is one place that you should check for background information.

Their website is at http://trentvalleyarchives.com/

Their Facebook page is at https://www.facebook.com/trentvalleyarchives

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving!


Well, it must be the fall season! The leave are finally turning colour, and that lets us know that fall is here. It is Thanksgiving weekend is Canada, so it’s time to take a break away from genealogy, and rest and relax with our families.

In the meantime, Ancestry.ca has just notified me that they are offering 40% off their Canada Deluxe Memberships for the Thanksgiving weekend.

Go to Ancestry.ca if you wish to take advantage of this offer!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Canada GenWeb is ten years old!

This completely skipped my mind – the Canada GenWeb was 10 years old October the 1st. Congratulations to Sherri Pettit and to all of those who contributed and still contribute to the website today!

Sherri says “Initially our plan was to offer a cemetery directory and list of available cemetery resources for genealogists. It quickly became a repository for photos, indexes and transcripts. 

Over the past ten years hundreds of volunteers have offered their time, expertise, and passion to help this project grow. Because of their efforts CanadaGenWeb's Cemetery Project now offers a directory of 20,000 known Canadian cemeteries, over 1,000,000 indexed names, and more than 600,000 photographs.” 

I am at the site nearly every day to look at their maps, their cemeteries, their pioneer's profiles and I have never been disappointed. It’s one of my “go-to” sites when I am doing research. 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

FamilySearch is looking for more indexers

I watched and listened to the Legacy Family Tree Webinar on Tuesday with Devin Ashby, Community Advocate for FamilySearch as he gave the talk Welcome to FamilySearch Indexing! The news is they are still looking for indexers. The webinar is free for the next seven days, so be sure to catch it at http://www.familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=213

You can go to https://familysearch.org/indexing/ to register to be an indexer, and there are projects that you can choose from at https://familysearch.org/indexing/projects/country/ca 

Meanwhile, British Columbia Death Registrations (1871-1986) at https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1538285 , and British Columbia Marriage Registration (1859-1932) at https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1307718 have been updated.