Showing posts with label genealogy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label genealogy. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Canadian Genealogy News (CGW) 25 August 2015


Here are some news items which have come across my desk this morning - 

Genealogical and Family Institute of Scottish Studies

Announcement has come from James Fraser, Scottish Studies Chair, at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario through his Twitter feed and on the Facebook page that there will be a new Genealogical and Family Institute of Scottish Studies.

To assist with the development of the new Institute, the University will begin a crowdfunding campaign in December of this year (2015).

Read about further developments here, when they become available.  


The Twitter account is at https://twitter.com/ScottishStudies


Board for Certification of Genealogists

The Board for Certification of Genealogists, an American based organization, has announced that Canadian genealogist, Alison Hare, CG, from Ottawa, Ontario has been re-elected for another three-year term as trustee. 

She has been certified since 1999, and is a fellow member of the Ontario Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists at http://ocapg.org/.

Congratulations, Alison! 

Meanwhile, happy researching!

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Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/08/canadian-week-in-review-cwr-23-august.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada! 

Monday, August 24, 2015

Canadian Week in Review (CWR) 23 August 2015





I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

In 1860, Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) arrived in Montreal during a tour of British North American colonies.

It took him 2 months to tour the provinces of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Upper Canada (Ontario), and Lower Canada (Quebec).

To read about King Edward VII, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_VII


Social Media

(Video) Heavy horse centre opening next week at Assiniboine Park Zoo

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/heavy-horse-centre-opening-next-week-at-assiniboine-park-zoo-1.3196262

Visitors to Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Zoo can soon learn about heavy horses, the "gentle giants" that had a prominent role in Manitoba's early history, at a new exhibit opening next week.

Newspaper Articles

Nova Scotia

HISTORY: Black River - history of a community

http://www.novanewsnow.com/Opinion/Columnists/2015-08-18/article-4246586/HISTORY%3A-Black-River---history-of-a-community/1

The occasion was the official opening of the new community hall in Black River, a hall that sprang from the ashes when the former school that had been standing for well over a century burned to the ground.

ED COLEMAN HISTORY: Etna, Vesuvius – two county ghost communities

http://www.kingscountynews.ca/Opinion/Columnists/2015-08-19/article-4249726/ED-COLEMAN-HISTORY%3A-Etna,-Vesuvius-%26ndash%3B-two-county-ghost-communities/1

To my surprise, Black River isn’t profiled in the book, at least not under that name. Yet a couple of Kings County communities are profiled that either don’t exist or were never officially recognized as communities. Etna and Vesuvius are two such communities that come to mind.

New Brunswick

Fort Beauséjour - Fort Cumberland to host presentation on First World War NB pilots

http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/News/Local/2015-08-19/article-4251024/Fort-Beausejour---Fort-Cumberland-to-host-presentation-on-First-World-War-NB-pilots/1

Fort Beauséjour - Fort Cumberland National Historic Site will host a special presentation on First World War New Brunswick pilots, including Albert Desbrisay Carter, one of Canada's top ace pilots of the time who was from Point de Bute.

Ontario

Cardinal Collins marks 400 years since first Mass in Ontario

http://www.catholicregister.org/item/20737-cardinal-collins-marks-400-years-since-first-mass-in-ontario

Four centuries ago, the first Mass west of Quebec was celebrated in the Huron-Wendat village of Carhagouha. On Aug. 15, Toronto's Cardinal Thomas Collins returned to that spot to mark the 400th anniversary of the event.

Exploring Champlain's city portage routes

http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/2015/08/17/exploring-champlains-city-portage-routes

A new book recounting Samuel de Champlain's portage routes through Peterborough is about to be published, 400 years after the French explorer's travels here.

Finding Champlain's Dream was co-written by Elwood Jones, the archivist with Trent Valley Archives, along with Alan Brunger and Peter Adams.

John By's answer to the homeless problem

http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/08/22/john-bys-answer-to-the-homeless-problemjohn-bys-answer-to-the-homeless-problemoneplan

This is an article about the squatters' villages which sprag up during the building of the Rideau Canal in Ottawa.

Saskatchewan

Naming bridges not complicated 

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Naming+bridges+complicated/11303755/story.html

It's nearly incomprehensible that 25 months after the opening of the bridge on Circle Drive South, with another two bridges expected to be built within three years, city council is still struggling to come up with an easy way to name Saskatoon's iconic structures that goes beyond a prosaic geographical description.

British Columbia

Lost piece of family history returned after 4 decades

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/lost-piece-of-family-history-returned-after-4-decades-1.3195375

Isn't this great news! One mystery auction and more than 15,000 km later, this 140-year-old family Bible goes home.

The Stories This Week 

New direction of the Ontario Genealogical Society blog

There has been quite a few changes at the Ontario Genealogical Society over the past couple years, and now there is a change of what you see at their blog.

In years past, it use to be the place where the news was posted, now, since March of this year, it is the place where you go to learn how to do Ontario genealogy. The news have been moved to the Facebook page.

So far the following articles have been posted -

Using the “Between” Records – County and City Directories 

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6136

Finding/Researching Your Canadian World War I Soldier Ancestor

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6143

Finding/Researching Your Canadian World War 1 Soldier Ancestor- Part 2

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6149

Making a Connection between Official Records

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6156

Men of the “Cloth”-Tracking Records for Preachers, Pastors and Priests

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6172

Family Stories – Truth or Fiction?

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6179

Who is She Actually? How Names Can Change in a Person’s Lifetime

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6184

So You Think That You Have a Brickwall- Part 1

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6191

So You Think That You Have a Brickwall-Part 2

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6197

So You Think You Have a Brickwall- Part 3

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6201

The Personals- More Than You Wanted to Know

http://www.ogs.on.ca/ogs_blog.php?p=6208

What do you of a society using their blog to post research articles? Have you found these articles helpful?

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Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/08/canadian-news-in-review-cwr-03-august.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, August 17, 2015

Canadian Week in Review (CWR) 17 August 2015




I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

The Canadian Women’s Army Corps, 1941-1946

The formation of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps during the Second World War is a milestone in the history of women’s participation in the Canadian military

To read more, you can go to the story at http://www.warmuseum.ca/education/online-educational-resources/dispatches/the-canadian-womens-army-corps-1941-1946/



Social Media 

(Photos) HANTS HISTORY (Aug. 6, 2015 edition)

http://www.hantsjournal.ca/Opinion/Columnists/2015-08-06/article-4237149/HANTS-HISTORY-(Aug.-6,-2015-edition)/1

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.
(Blog) Blythe Family Ancestry

http://www.emptynestancestry.com/blythegenealogy/index.php

(Photos) Rail history tracked to Merritton
The Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway — one of the first electric interurban railways in Canada — was commemorated with a plaque in Merritton where one of its stations once stood.

Newspaper Articles

Newfoundland

Built to last 

http://www.thetelegram.com/section/2015-08-10/article-4239031/Built-to-last/1

Members of YW today have gone back in the provincial archives looking in daily newspapers for references to the organization, searching for any pieces of news that could be added to the chronological story. But you have to enjoy looking for that proverbial needle in a haystack.

Quebec

Quebec considering removing N-word from 11 place names


A stretch of the Gatineau River that has officially been called Nigger Rapids for decades could be renamed— along with 10 other sites in Quebec whose names include the racial slur.

And the latest new is that Quebec is considering changing the name of a local rapids, and you can read about it at http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/08/11/quebec-locales-using

If you want to read how Quebec chooses the names for places, you ca go to http://www.toponymie.gouv.qc.ca/ct/english.aspx

Ontario 

LEE DICKSON GENEALOGY: Follows the lives of Thomas Mathews and his son John through the Upper Canada land records


Continued from the previous June and July columns, the lives of Thomas Mathews and his son John are traced forward through the Upper Canada land records. This next part of their story involves the settlement of the Town of York, established 1793. 

GENEALOGY WITH JANICE: Small town newspapers are a boon for family historian


If you have family or relatives who lived in a small town - check out the local newspapers! So many are now online, it’s easy. And lots of fun. 

Living History Day gives Lost Villages a blast from the past


The valuable role of Canadians in the American Civil War of 1861 to 1865 came to life at the Lost Villages Museum in Long Sault.

Alberta 

Hanna roundhouse reunion celebrates railroad history


Roundhouses once dotted the prairies, spaced along the railroad where workers needed a chance to rest and locomotives would be resupplied and inspected.

Now, very few remain. Many have simply crumbled away and the physical legacy of Canadian railroad history is disappearing. One of the few examples of these buildings left is the roundhouse outside of Hanna, Alta.

British Columbia

Dreamers and Dissidents' profiles legends of the Kootenays

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dreamers-and-dissidents-profiles-legends-of-the-kootenays-1.3180664

The Knowledge Network debuted a new documentary series this week produced by Nelson's Amy Bohigian that tells the stories of some of the most interesting and inspiring characters the Kootenays has ever produced. 

Kaplan heritage sign removed for illegal replacement


The neon blue Kaplan sign that has hung for decades on a Vancouver heritage building at the corner of Granville and Broadway has been replaced with an illegal red sign, raising the ire of heritage activists and citizens alike.

The Stories This Week

Gold is discovered in the Yukon Territory in 1896


On 16 August 1896, gold was discovered near Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada.

It was discovered by Aborginals from the Skookum tribe - Jim Mason and Tagish Charlie. George Carmack, from Seattle, was also with them when they made the discovery. They found the gold in Rabbit Creek, near Dawson, in the Yukon, and the creek was renamed Bonanza Creek – the site of the Klondike Gold Rush. 

After word reaches the United States in June of 1897, thousands of Americans headed to the Klondike to seek their fortunes.

Within six months, approximately 100,000 gold-seekers set off for the Yukon. Because it was so arduous to get to the site (they had to use pack animals or sleds to carry hundreds of pounds of supplies), only about 30,000 completed the trip.

Dawson City located on the way to the Klondike, and it temporarily became the largest city north of San Francisco! What had stated out as a tent city, soon boasted fire hydrants on the streets, and was the first city in western Canada to have electric lights. And the growth of Dawson was largely responsible for the creation of the Yukon Territory as a new Canadian Province on June 13, 1898. 

And other Canadian cities out west also had dramatic growth due to the Klondike Gold Rush. Vancouver, British Columbia saw its population double, and in Alberta, Edmonton's population tripled. 

So there is a nutshell is the story of the Klondike Gold Rush.

There are many places that you can look for information. For instance,

The Klondike Gold Rush 1890s


Klondike Gold Rush


Gold Rush History 


Gives a time line of the gold rush, and what is going on this summer in the Klondike.

===========================================================================

Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/08/canadian-news-in-review-cwr-03-august.html


It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, August 10, 2015

Canadian Week in Review (CWR) 10 August 2015




I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

On August 3, 1995, the celebrated bush pilot, Clennell Haggerston “Punch” Dickins passed away. Dickins had a long and distinguished aviation career, serving in both First and Second World Wars, mapping the northern territories during the 1930s, and helping make Canada a leader in frontier aviation.

For further information, go to http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/cseh-twih/index_e.asp

The Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre is located in Sault Ste. Marie, and it will be celebrating Bushplane Days September 19 and 20, 2015. The Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre (CBHC) was formed in 1987 by a small group of volunteers wishing to preserve Ontario's rich bushplane and firefighting heritage.

For further information, go to http://www.bushplane.com/

Newspaper Articles

Newfoundland

Heritage Shop on Signal Hill reopens after four-month closure
The Signal Hill Heritage Shop finally reopened Friday, after it was closed for four months due to construction on Cabot. 

Prince Edward Island

Stompin' Tom's P.E.I. homestead to become cultural attraction
A new Stompin' Tom Connors tribute attraction will be built in Skinners Pond, on the western tip of P.E.I., where the Canadian folk icon grew. The 4,000-square-foot facility will be names the Stompin' Tom Centre and Schoolhouse museum.

Nova Scotia

More than 350 gather for historic Colley reunion in East Preston
Harriet Fagan’s faith, and that of her fellow organizers of the Colley family reunion, was rewarded on the weekend as more than 350 people gathered in East Preston to celebrate the legacy of one of the oldest, most historic (and biggest) families in the area.

First World War touched everyday lives in Halifax, Atlantic Canada
While Canadian soldiers were fighting in Europe during the First World War, the effects of the conflict were increasingly felt on the home front — nowhere more so than in parts of Atlantic Canada.

Beinn Bhreagh declared a Nova Scotia heritage property
Almost 130 years after Alexander Graham Bell first laid eyes on Beinn Bhreagh, the mountainside estate that has been the summer home to generations of his descendants has officially been declared a Nova Scotia heritage property.

Manitoba

Lower Fort Garry powwow commemorates Treaty 1 agreement
Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site hosted its annual Treaty 1 commemoration ceremony on Monday, marking an agreement between Canada's First Nations and the Crown that was made almost 150 years ago.

British Columbia

World War II bomber on display in Penticton, B.C.
A piece of Second World War history touched down in British Columbia's Okanagan region on Monday. One of the last remaining B-17 bombers flew into Penticton and will be on display for a week.

The Stories This Week

Posts return to their regular format tomorrow Tuesday 11 August 2015.

===========================================================================

Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/08/canadian-news-in-review-cwr-03-august.html


It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, August 3, 2015

Canadian News in Review (CWR) 03 August 2015





I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 


In 1793, General John Graves Simcoe, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, began clearing land for the site for the city of York. Why is that important? Because today, York is known as Toronto, the capitol of Ontario. Worried about a possible war with the Americans, Simcoe moved the capital from Newark, Niagara, to the Toronto Bay area. 

For further information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/York,_Upper_Canada

In 1962, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker officially opened the Trans-Canada Highway to traffic at ceremonies at Rogers Pass, British Columbia. The opening of the 7,821-km road, the longest national highway in the world, meant Canadians could drive directly from St. John's, Newfoundland to Victoria, British Columbia.  

To read more about the Trans-Canada Highway, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Canada_Highway


Social Media

(Photos) Hants HISTORY (July 30, 2015 edition)
Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

(Video) Port Coquitlam's core reopens after blaze collapses four buildings
Downtown Port Coquitlam—including City Hall— had begun to reopen on Thursday afternoon after flames scorched four buildings and caused millions of dollars damage earlier in the day.

Newspaper Articles

Quebec

Gatineau woman fights to change baby's name to recognize infant's deceased father

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/gatineau-woman-fights-to-change-baby-s-name-to-recognize-infant-s-deceased-father-1.3176847

A Gatineau woman is fighting to get her child's name changed to recognize the baby's father, who died of flesh-eating disease before the little girl was born.

Ontario

Rockton's Westfield Heritage Village to receive $42,214 from Canada 150 fund
On Tuesday, Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale MP David Sweet, on behalf of Minister of the Federal Economic Development Agency of Southern Ontario Gary Goodyear, announced more than $847,000 in funding for six projects, including three in Flamborough. 

Bringing history to life at Lost Villages 
Fundraising efforts are underway to build a first-ever National War Monument dedicated to Canadian soldiers who fought along-side Americans during their Civil War. President of the Lost Villages Historical Society Jim Brownell said the monument will be the first of its kind in Canada and will be prominently displayed at the Lost Villages.

Manitoba

Guest Post: The Top 10 Reasons Icelanders Should Attend Manitoba’s ‘Íslendingadagurinn’ Party
The Icelandic Festival of Manitoba—Íslendingadagurinn—celebrates Icelandic culture and heritage through a fun, family-friendly four-day event, held every August long weekend in Gimli, Manitoba, Canada. 

Alberta

Military museum offers a glimpse at history
One way for military history to be preserved is to ask for pictures or artifacts passed down from generation to generation from family members throughout the county, southern Alberta, the province, the country and across the globe. The Lethbridge Military Museum does just that - it preserves the stories of veterans.

British Columbia

B.C. Ferries names new vessels leaving name calling in its wake
After a choppy start to B.C. Ferries name search for their new ferries, three new titles were chosen today, in honour of West Coast Salish history and its legends - Salish Raven, Salish Orca and Salish Eagle.

Rossland to Host Heritage Conference -- Tickets Now Available 
Heritage BC, a charitable non profit, announces the opening of registration for their annual conference, taking place October 2-3 in Rossland, B.C.

This year’s conference, The Main Thing follows on the national Heritage Week theme promoting main streets as an vital part of heritage conservation and economic stimulation. 

Nunavut

Fort Conger, historic High Arctic fort, to be preserved in 3D
A historic fort threatened by melting permafrost in one of the most remote locations on Earth might be preserved thanks to 3D technology.

Fort Conger on Ellesmere Island was established in 1875 by British explorers looking for the North Pole.

The Stories This Week 

An abbreviated version of Canadian Week in Review (CWR) has been produced this week due to vacation. I will return from vacation the 11 of August.

Thank you.

==========================================================================


Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/07/canadian-week-in-review-cwr-27-july-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, July 27, 2015

Canadian Week in Review (CWR) 27 July 2015



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too. 

This Week in Canadian History 


The Overlanders of 1862: Journeying West for Gold

Their journey had begun in southern Ontario (Niagara) and would end in the gold fields of the Cariboo Mountains, within what later became the province of British Columbia.




In 1915, Canada's foremost railway surveyor and construction engineer, Sir Sandford Fleming, died in Halifax at age 86. He helped devise a route for the Canadian Pacific Railway through the Rockies. Fleming also helped develop a way to divide the world into time zones and also designed Canada's first postage stamp.

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandford_Fleming

Social Media

(Blog) Ezard – The Name and its History
The EZARD One-Name Study is registered with the Guild of One-Name Studies by blogger Jill Ezard. There are some names in Canada.

(Photos) Special find
Alex Yeadon knows of the importance a military medal holds, so when his mother came across one
by chance, he took it upon himself to try and find the family. 

Newspaper Articles

Prince Edward Island 

More churches are popping up on P.E.I.'s real estate market but the buildings are proving a tough sell.
Realtor Jeff Newson has never sold a church before, but now he's trying to sell two — the United Churches in Kingston and in New Dominion. 

Nova Scotia

Amherst heritage building likely faces the wrecking ball
A provincially registered heritage property that's been a landmark in downtown Amherst for more than a century could soon be history.

Amherst town councillors have voted to demolish the red sandstone former Bank of Montreal building at the corner of Victoria and LaPlanche streets.

Ontario

Artist Jimi McKee wants facelift for totem pole
As Jimi McKee works to restore a piece of Canadian history sitting on a trailer in his yard, his thoughts also turn to a fixture in Couchiching Beach Park.

Plaque honouring William F. Sharpe unveiled in Prescott 
The Grenville County Historical Society held a special unveiling and dedication on Saturday for a historical plaque commemorating Lt. William F. Sharpe.

One of Canada's first military airmen during the Great War (1914-1918) 

British Columbia

McVittie House, Land Surveying Office open at Fort Steele
Dignitaries and guests gathered on Saturday July 11 at Fort Steele Heritage Town to celebrate the grand opening of McVittie House and Land Surveying Office.

The Stories This Week

Summer in Canada is our time to hold special conference, and to those who like picnic, there is that too!

On Tuesday 28 July 2015 at 6 p.m., there will be a Picnic Potluck and Cemetery Walk - Bruce and Grey Branch Ontario Genealogical Society, Owen Sound, ON at the Place: Family History Centre, 490 2nd Ave S.E. Owen Sound. 

The Picnic Potluck will start at 6 p.m. and then a Cemetery walk with Terri Jackson at Greenwood Cemetery, Owen Sound Please bring along a favorite potluck dish to share and a plate & cutlery for your dinner. After dinner join us for a cemetery walk through Greenwood Cemetery, located at 290 1st Street S.W. Owen Sound, with our own Terri Jackson as our tour guide. We invite you to join us! All are welcome!

Call 519-534-1875 for further information

Thursday 06 August to Sunday 09 August 2015, there will be the Convention: The Society for German Genealogy in Eastern Europe (SGGEE), Gatineau, Quebec and the theme will be Researching Our German Roots in Poland and the Russian Empire.

It will be located in Gatineau, Quebec just across the river from Ottawa, Ontario, and my husband and myself will be going to this convention in hopes of learning lots of information about German Roots in Poland and Russia.

To find out further information, go to https://www.sggee.org/


Friday 21 August and Saturday 22 August 2015, there will be One World, One Family Conference in Brampton Ontario. The organizers and host Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Family History Center, 10062 Bramalea Rd., Brampton, Ontario. 

Lesley Anderson - Connecting with our Ancestors is an Incredible Journey will be the keynote speaker.

To see the rest of the speakers, go to http://www.oneworldonefamily-theevent.com/



The Sir Andrew Macphail Homestead is delighted to invite guests to join in its inaugural 'Eilean an Àigh: Celebration of Island Gaelic Language and Culture' Festival, taking place on site in Orwell, Prince Edward Island at 271 Macphail Park Road, the evening of Friday, 31 July, and throughout the day Prince Edward Island on Saturday, 1 August 2015. 

This year they are delighted to host Dr. John Shaw of the School of Scottish Studies, University of Edinburgh and James Watson of the Nova Scotia Highland Village Museum, who worked together recording surviving Island Scottish Gaelic traditions in 1987 under the auspices of the Institute of Island Studies, University of Prince Edward Island. 

James Watson will be leading a workshop focusing on the regional repertoire of Scottish Gaelic songs as well as a hands-on 'thickening frolic' (luathadh) that will allow participants to join in around the table with choruses they learned in the workshop. The festival will conclude with Taigh Cèilidh 'ic Phàil (Macphail Cèilidh House) grand finale concert with special guests, including many of our talented Island musicians and singers for an evening of song, story, and foot-tapping tunes.

Spaces are limited and pre-booking is highly recommended. Full two-day festival passes, including special lunch, evening lecture and finale cèilidh concert, are available at a discounted $50. There will also be limited passes available for these events individually. 

Thigibh air chèilidh! Bidh fàilte chridheil romhaibh! (Come for a visit! A hearty welcome awaits you!)

For more information, go to http://macphailhomestead.ca/

And that was the Canadian genealogy, history, and heritage news in Canada this past week!

Saturday, July 18, 2015

Extra news items 18 July 2015




Here are some news items which have come across my desk this morning -

 Word has been received that Stuart Ash, the Canadian designer of the last Centennial logo in 1967, is less than impressed with the newly chosen logo for the official celebration of Canada's 150th birthday. He says the choice of the logo was 'too complicated and confusing'.





It looks like the KICKSTARTER project that was underway for the Oak Island Project has been cancelled if you can believe the latest news on the website at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1730663204/expedition-to-oak-island-nova-scotia-canada-the-mo.

The message says “ Funding for this project was canceled by the project creator about 21 hours ago”, and although no reason was given, it looks like it is no-go for the expedition to Oak Island. 


And finally, the Ontario Heritage Trust is seeking nominations to the Lieutenant Governor's Ontario Heritage Awards and Young Heritage Leaders – its annual recognition programs celebrating contributions to heritage conservation. The nomination deadline is September 30, 2015, 

22 Lieutenant Governor's Ontario Heritage Awards – representing 335 individuals, one community and three projects – were presented for outstanding achievements to conserving Ontario's heritage in 2014, and 195 youth were recognized through Young Heritage Leaders for their volunteer contributions in 2014.


Until next time, this is what crossed my desk this morning.

=====================================================================


Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/07/canadian-week-in-review-13-july-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Extra news items 14 July 2015

Here are some news items which have come across my desk this morning -

Just a reminder that the exhibit named Ordinary Lives Extraordinary Times at the Guelph Museum will be closing August 9th.

Columbus Centre explores the experiences of Italian Canadians following Italy’s entry into the Second World War. Through video, audio and text, the exhibition puts a human face to this little-known period in Canadian history.

To set the times that the museum is open, go to
http://guelphmuseums.ca/event/ordinary-lives-extraordinary-times-italian-canadian-experience-world-war-ii/


They have discovered an error in the written tribute to Tom Longboat, the Aborginal runner from the Six Nations and 1907 Boston Marathon Winner. The misspelled word - Persistence is spelled as Persistance.

The statue of the Onondaga long-distance runner is in Ontario’s Celebration Zone near Harbourfront Centre

To read more the story, go to http://www.thestar.com/news/crime/2015/07/12/a-typo-for-tom-longboat-on-pan-am-games-sculpture.html

A blog posting called the Railway Sleeping Car Porters has been put on by Library and Archives Canada, which is good news for those who have Canadian ancestors.

It gives their stories, plus photos, and the Stanley G. Grizzle fonds at http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_archives/index.php?fuseaction=genitem.displayItem&lang=eng&rec_nbr=3728356, and the Railway Employees (Employees Provident Fund) at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/railway-employees-provident-fund/Pages/railway-employees.aspx

Prince Edward Island Railway, 1899, cover and map


And finally, Dick Eastman has put on the Index to French Canadian Revolutionary War Patriots

I must admit, I haven't hears of this before, and I see where there are two people by the same surname as my husband's ancestors  – Audet dit Lapointe. I will have to take a look.

Debbie Duay of Fort Lauderdale, Florida has compiled an index to French Canadian Revolutionary War patriots from Quebec that appear in the Baby, Taschereau, and Williams journal and/or Virginia Easley DeMarce’s Canadian Participants in the American Revolution – An Index.

Her index appears at http://www.learnwebskills.com/patriot/frenchcanadianpatriots.htm.

Until next time, this is what crossed my desk this morning.

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/07/canadian-week-in-review-13-july-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Extra news items 11 July 2015


Here are some news items which have come across the desk this morning -

Isn't this a neat idea from Canada's heritage!

Cheryl Horgan, a local St. John's artist, is making jewellery from a church's copper roofing. And she is using the copper roofing as it is stripped off the 160-year-old Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, so that the copper roofing can be replaced.

Cheryl is donating two third of the sales to the restoration effort of the roof of the church.

To read the rest of the story, go to http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/cheryl-horgan-is-making-jewellery-from-church-s-copper-roofing-1.3147264


And her come another neat idea.

To the Revitalizing Indigenous Agriculture Project, methods of indigenous culture will be used to plant the seeds and help the garden grow at the Wanuskewin Heritage Park in Saskatoon.

And they are using Mohawk traditions using the idea of growing for sustenance.

To see the pictures of the garden, go to http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/saskatoon-community-garden-grows-thanks-to-aboriginal-culture-1.3147407


And finally, there is the project called A Flanders Field in London, Ontario, a remembrance project that about a dozen local volunteers has been busy planing a garden of poppies.

The garden will be on the city-owned park on the southwest corner of Veterans Memorial Parkway and River Road. Over the past two years, they’ve been developing a large poppy garden to honour veterans, remember soldiers who have fallen and provide information about Canada’s military history.

Here is the story in the paper http://www.thelondoner.ca/2015/07/10/remembrance-gardens-nearly-ready-for-dedication

Here is their website at http://remembernovember11.com/

Until next time, this is what crossed my desk this morning.

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/07/cwr-06-july-2015.html

 It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Monday, July 6, 2015

Canadian Week in Review 06 July 2015


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

In 1784, Britain split the colony of Nova Scotia into three separate colonies: New Brunswick, Cape Breton Island, and present-day peninsular Nova Scotia. The capital city was Sydney.

In 1820, the colony of Cape Breton Island was once again merged with Nova Scotia.
To read more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Breton_Island



In 1833, Capt. John Ross and 19 of his crew were rescued from Baffin Island. After their ship became ice-bound, they survived by living with Inuit for three years.

He led three Arctic expeditions, the last one in 1850, when he set out to find Sir John Franklin. Upon returning, he settled in Scotland, and died in London in 1856.
For further information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ross_(Arctic_explorer)

Social Media

(Photos) History of Digby’s old public clock – new town clock to be dedicated this Saturday
http://www.novanewsnow.com/Community/2015-06-18/article-4187122/History-of-Digby%26rsquo%3Bs-old-public-clock-%26ndash%3B-new-town-clock-to-be-dedicated-this-Saturday/1
Digby’s new town clock will be the first one on Water Street since 1963, when the old post office was torn down.

Articles

Nova Scotia

Why no Loyalist Day for Nova Scotia?
http://www.digbycourier.ca/News/Local/2015-06-18/article-4186796/Why-no-Loyalist-Day-for-Nova-Scotia%3F/1
The Loyalists' arrival in Nova Scotia after the American Revolution doubled the province’s population, and today 20 percent or more of Nova Scotians could have an ancestor who was a United Empire Loyalist.

Local lighthouse competing for top prize
http://www.guysboroughjournal.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=82:local-lighthouse-competing-for-top-prize&catid=42:front-page-stories
The Port Bickerton Lighthouse is battling it out with other lighthouses in Nova Scotia in Heritage Canada’s “This Lighthouse Matters” crowd-funding competition, which began June 17.
Parks Canada has just named 74 lighthouses at http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/lhn-nhs/pp-hl/page01.aspx

Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf remembered over Bedford Days
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/vice-admiral-harry-dewolf-remembered-over-bedford-days-1.3128308
Thousands of people will celebrate Bedford Days over the weekend, and many will do so in DeWolf Park, the waterfront hub for the Halifax community.
   Few may know the man who gave the park its name: Bedford resident and naval hero, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

Prince Edward Island

Battle of Waterloo P.E.I. veteran celebrated
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/battle-of-waterloo-p-e-i-veteran-celebrated-1.3119725
A ceremony Thursday commemorated a veteran of the Battle of Waterloo, whose grave was recently discovered in a small community in eastern P.E.I.

Feasts, workshops from Macphail's new kitchen
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/feasts-workshops-from-macphail-s-new-kitchen-1.3127083
A newly-renovated kitchen at P.E.I.'s Sir Andrew MacPhail Homestead is allowing the historic property to expand its programming.

New Brunswick

Birch bark canoe from 1800s fails to excite museum community
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/birch-bark-canoe-from-1800s-fails-to-excite-museum-community-1.3112010
The canoe is around 195 years old, and it has been stored upside down in Richard Paul's garage. It is wrapped carefully in plastic to keep its fragile web of ribs and birch bark intact.

Manitoba

Don Murray Museum collection goes to auction
http://www.mywestman.ca/community-news/3947-don-murray-museum-collection-goes-to-auction.html
In a two-day auction to be held July 4 and 5, Don Murray will disburse his extensive collection of antiques, collectibles, and artifacts from his private on-site museum.

Alberta

Historic church gateway to Alberta’s past
http://www.cochranetimes.com/2015/06/18/historic-church-gateway-to-albertas-past
A solitary church stands near a natural ford by the Bow River along Highway 1A between Cochrane and Morley.
   In its 140th year, the George McDougall Memorial United Church is a monument to what once was, and a reflection to what has developed since.

Grain elevators as art in Spruce Grove
http://www.sprucegroveexaminer.com/2015/06/26/grain-elevators-as-art-in-spruce-grove
Last weekend was a busy one for the Spruce Grove Agricultural Society as they played host to the Alberta Grain Elevator Society (AGES) and its membership from across the province

The Stories This Week

Read the whole census, please!
One thing that beginning genealogists don’t do is read enough. And they would say, “I read everything. I have never had so much to read in all my life – history, immigration, profile ...”.

But I ask, “When you try to find your ancestor in the 1851/52 census, for example, do you read every page of the census? There may be facts lying there in the weeds, so to speak, which you may not discover on the first reading of the census report of that particular area that the ancestor is from.”

For example, the census of this particular effort was taken by an English-speaking enumerator. When it came to surnames, he wrote down what he heard. And since many of the people were French – the surnames are somewhat “tortured”, so to speak.

Second, there are a number of pages to this particular census.

If you can’t find your ancestor, maybe they were in jail, for instance. On this particular census, two people were in jail, and the enumerator wrote them on the last pages of the census – albeit removed a number of pages from where I was looking at my ancestor.

Also, on the first pages of the census, the enumerator wrote a small description of the village in which he gave a picture of the place as it was in 1851/1852.

So the moral of the story is to watch what you read. Make sure you read all of the census, and don't disregard the "small stuff:".

And that was the Canadian genealogy, history, and heritage news in Canada this past week!


 Canada Day Contest


This year, for the annual Canada Day Contest sponsored by the Canadian Week in Review, the skill-testing question is -

This year, Canadians celebrate the birthday of Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. The question is - When was his birthday, and where was he born? Hint: Like a true immigrant, he wasn't born in Canada!

One winner will be drawn from the correct entries.

The lucky contestant will get a free consultation with me in which they will be told of some of the places they can look to hopefully discover the year in which their Canadian ancestor immigrated to Canada, or some other detail.

The contest will close at the end of Canada History Week at midnight on Wednesday, 07 July 2015.

Place "Canada Day Contest" in the subject of the email to genealogyreserch@aol.com




Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/06/canadian-week-in-review-cwr-29-june-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!